Involved Leopards

Makhotini 3:3 Male

Makhotini 3:3 Male

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James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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11 Comments

on Narrow Escapes for the Ostrich

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Loretta
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This is very nerve racking to say the least. Does she have any other defense besides running away? This doesn’t seem to be a good situation for her now that the carnivores are realizing she is edible! I hope she stays safe.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Loretta,

Ostriches have a phenomenally powerful kick, which when allied with their large and sharp toe-nail/claw, could be a formidable defence. Having said that, I think when confronted with the big cats, their first line of defence would almost always be to flee!

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Run girl run! You have survived thus far, so keep smart!! 🙂 Thank you James & have a wonderful weekend & look forward to an update please 🙂

Wendy MacNicol
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May I just say my husband Neil and I have just spent time with friends at Mabula Timeshare. At a meeting with timesharers and the usual Thursday Tea, the Reserve Manager told us that they recently acquired two very large male cheetahs from Namibia (I think). They weigh around 65 kilos each and have been taking down large animals. Mabula had 64 ostriches but the Cheetahs have now reduced the number to 4! They DO enjoy their poultry! They also acquired a young female Cheetah who has produced 2 little males. So some juggling will be done here in due course.

Wendy MacNicol
Member
Guest

Further to the above may I add that these 2 male Cheetahs. not being able to finish off a large meal, have walked off and left it to come back to later. However – leopards from around the area are now coming to finish off the meals left by the Cheetahs and are turning into Happy Scavengers. The result is that a LOT more sightings of leopards are happening at Mabula. Everyone’s happy – the Cheetahs, the Leopards and the Tourists!!

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Wendy,
Thanks for the update. I imagine the one party that is not so happy are the remaining 4 Ostriches!

Jill Larone
Member
Guest

I’m happy to see this girl is holding her own so far! Let’s hope that continues! What is the normal life span of an Ostrich (assuming she doesn’t get eaten first!)? Thanks for the great pictures and video James, and I look forward to further updates.

MJ Bradley
Member
Guest

Wow, may those Ostrich should retreat into the Kruger while they still have their feathers.. Would be very difficult to raise chicks in that environment.

Anna Lee
Member
Guest

Awesome footage! Just goes to show that every animal has its own magnificence.

I love the ostrich. So glad you shared this bit about them.
Please continue to talk to us about them and keep us posted on their hijinks and adventures.

Vickie
Member
Guest

Maybe color vision also is a feature in the bird’s favor?

Ginger
Member
Guest

What resilience to make a such a solitary home amongst all these predators! Is it normal for ostriches to be on their own like she has for so long (until her male pal has been present of late…though with this going on I see him high-tailing it out soon). I am cheering for this girl and feeling a bit of kinship with her.

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