About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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10 Comments

on Could This Be Londolozi’s Most Successful Lion Pride?

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Nancy Armitage
Member
Guest

I remember seeing the Majingilanes after they had chased the Mhangeni ( break away Tslalas then) 4 lion cubs away with the old tailless lioness leading them to “safety” to raise them. They were feeding on the elephant that had to be put down because of continuing threatening behavior in camp. They were not yet used to vehicles and very wary of us as we watched them and their interaction with the remaining 2 Tsalala lioness. We could not have imagined at that time the legacy they would be leaving in the Londolozi area.

Marinda Drake
Member
Guest

Fascinating stuff!

Arden Zalman
Member
Guest

Great soap opera drama–can’t wait for the next episode.

Sauwah
Member
Guest

It is always a gift to us the cubs are safe & growing , do not care which pride .

Kate Collins
Guest contributor

Thanks for the update JT, always great to see how the lion dynamics unfold.

Mark
Member
Guest

It’ sa very interesting situation, but overall congratulations to the write, easy to read and creating suspence…i wait for next updates

Brandon
Member
Guest

What an interesting read James. Lion dynamics are always very interesting. I follow a few of the other lodges in the area and it interesting to see how the Mighty Majingilane are mating with the Otthawa females at the moment. They seem to have chased the Selati males away fro the moment. Just out of interest, how many Matimba males are there? last I heard there were 4 and at one stage about 6 or so? Have you ever seen these males. Would the pose a big threat to the Majingilane males?

Regards
Brandon

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Great blog James, and as always, fantastic photos. I love hearing about the lions, especially the Majingilane. They are fascinating to watch and so beautiful. I hope they all survive and live a long life.

scott stevens
Member
Guest

Great blog love following the male lion coalitions. In the blog you mentioned the sand river males and the selati to the west. The selati how much younger are they I thought it was just like a year or so younger which should put them closer to prime but heard the Selati had tuberculous is that true? Also there are only three sand river males now correct?

Shardool Kulkarni
Member
Guest

I hope all 9 cubs reach it. However I think there were 12 cubs in total. One of the lionesses had 4 cubs of which only 1 is alive, two of the lionesses have got 3 cubs each surviving so far and the last one has 2 cubs, bringing the total to 12 cubs born and 9 surviving.

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