About the Author

Amy Attenborough

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Amy has a rich field-guiding history, having spent time at both Phinda and Ngala Game Reserves. This diversity of past guiding locations brought her an intimate understanding of different biomes across South Africa, and she immediately began making a name for herself as ...

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8 Comments

on What A Hungry Elephant Can Teach You

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Jenny
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Another thought provoking piece Amy and once again you have provided food for the soul. Looking forward to your next blog. Thank you.

Wendy Hawkins
Member
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Oh just amazing this is Amy, thank you! Those cheeky ellies just being who they are dominant 🙂

Brent
Member
Guest

This is quite a profound, informative and comforting piece. You packed a lot in there and it was exactly what I needed today. Thank you Amy!

Kim Jacobson
Member
Guest

Always so interesting and informative….I constantly learn new things from your Blogs….Thank You !!!

Jenny
Member
Guest

Thanks for reminding us Amy 😊

Susan Strauss
Member
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Cutie pie elephant

Judy Hayden (Corpus Christi, Texas)
Member
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Those impalas are smart. Get away from the fruit. Thank you for that video and the information. Captivating as usual..

Bharat
Member
Guest

Amy, when we scour through elephant droppings we often find the pods of the torchwood tree,more or less intact, undigested save for part of the skin. I understand that an elephants digestive tract is not as efficient as ruminants and so the pods may in fact help in the breakdown of roughage in the stomach rather than have a huge nutritive value. Birds and crocodile do ingest grit and stones to aid digestion, so perhaps ellies do the same. Great blog, well done.

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