About the Author

Kyle Gordon

Contributor

Kyle was born and raised in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe. His childhood was spent scurrying barefooted along the banks of various rivers and dams, fishing rod ever-in-hand, enjoying the beauty and freedom of outdoors. Kyle obtained a degree in construction from UCT ...

View Kyle's profile

28 Comments

on Life from a vulture’s perspective

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Nick Etches
Explorer

Nice piece Kyle!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thanks so much, Nick.

Willa Stanger
Senior Digital Ranger

So, I can almost hear the symphony that someone must compose to accompany this lyrical exposition. Mighty powerful, Kyle. Thank you.

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thanks so much, Willa. It really was a lot of fun to write and think through a day in the life of a vulture!

William Paynter
Master Tracker

Kyle, what a great story you have written for the vultures. Thanks for sharing. Wonderful pictures to accompany the story, well done.

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

I’m glad you enjoyed, William!

Paul Canales
Master Tracker

I love this post Kyle! Like other Londolozi posts about oft unappreciated scavengers, vultures catch a bad rap – calling someone a “vulture” or a group of people “vultures” is no compliment. But these birds play a critical role and are majestic in their own way. Thanks again!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Exactly! Incredibly complex animals that often don’t get the attention they deserve. Thanks Paul.

Christa Blessing
Master Tracker

Kyle, a really poetic article on vultures and their abilities and lives. Great!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thanks for having a read, Christa.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

What a powerful and insightful story you have told us. It almost made me feel as though I was living the life of this vulture, from her dew covered wings shedding their moisture to soaring over the bush, looking for the signs of a kill. Whilst I feel sad for the leopard who lost its kill, there is the scavenger few that also need to survtin order to maintain the balance that nature requires in order to remain healthy. Thank you for this creative glimpse into the vulture’s world!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thanks so much for reading, Denise. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

Paul Buchanan
Senior Digital Ranger

Really fascinating discussion. Very well-written. I didn’t know the the reason for vultures not having many feathers on their heads was because it makes cleaning easier. Thanks!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Hi Paul, thanks so much for the comments. I’m glad you enjoyed the story, it was a lot of fun to write.

Valmai Vorster
Master Tracker

The vultures is a dead give away to the predators watching the vultures flight, they know there’s a carcus somewhere and follow the vultures. Shame I always feel sorry for the leopards and Cheetah who always have to render their hard earned kill to the hyenas. But that’s what happens in the wild.

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

It is indeed just the natural flow of things. Often as not, the leopard and cheetah may also get to finish their meal in peace. Thanks Valmai.

Cindy Reich
Explorer

Beautiful writing, Kyle!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thank you very much, Cindy!

Michel Beni
Guest contributor

I’ve witnessed this scene many times, unaware, however, of the moving parts within it.

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

It’s always fun to try and envisage the bigger picture. Thanks, Vin.

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

Great blog, Kyle. There’s a place near where I live in the UK called the Hawk Conservancy, and every day they do flying displays – various owls and eagles and also vultures. All the birds swoop down over the audience, almost touching your head. They do a lot of conservation work in Africa with vultures; I hadn’t realised how endangered some of them are.

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

They are such an integral part of these systems, Suzanne. It’s great that places like you visit are there to spread awareness.

Bob and Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Wow Kyle, your writing style and the way you paint a picture for the reader is top notch … it’s like reading a travel magazine. You should consider writing travel and/or wildlife blogs. You have a keen eye for detail and a writer’s colorful vocabulary for describing what you see in a way that brings the reader right into the vehicle with you! Kudos to you!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Bob and Lucie, thank you so much for those words. They mean a lot. I really had a lot of fun writing this blog and am glad you enjoyed the read! Hope you two are both well, looking forward to having you back here soon.

Mary Beth Wheeler
Guest contributor

Interesting blog, Kyle. I like your having told it from the perspective of a vulture – very effective. Thanks!

Kyle Gordon
Contributor

Thanks so much, Mary Beth.

Gay Walker
Explorer

A great piece of writing. Kept me totally absorbed and imagining every moment of the vultures day. Fabulous.

Patrick Smyth
Explorer

Beautifully and artistically written. You are a very good writer, Kyle. Congratulations!. I can’t wait for the book version of your time in the bushveld.

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile