Involved Leopards

Makomsava 4:4 female

Makomsava 4:4 female

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Mashaba 3:3 Female

Mashaba 3:3 Female

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Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

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Ndzutini 3:4 Female

Ndzutini 3:4 Female

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Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

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Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

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Nkuwa 3:3 Female

Nkuwa 3:3 Female

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Ntsumi 3:3 Female

Ntsumi 3:3 Female

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Piccadilly 3:3 Young Female

Piccadilly 3:3 Young Female

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Piccadilly 3:3 female

Piccadilly 3:3 female

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Plaque Rock 3:3 Female

Plaque Rock 3:3 Female

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Three Rivers 2:2 Female

Three Rivers 2:2 Female

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Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

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Xinzele 4:4 Female

Xinzele 4:4 Female

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About the Author

Dan Hirschowitz

Ranger

Dan developed his love for the African bush whilst growing up on a family run farm in the Kwa-Zulu Natal midlands. Growing up in the bushveld he was surrounded by wildlife and finds his passion in what nature has to offer. After completing ...

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25 Comments

on Leopard Territories Update: Part 2- Females

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William Paynter
Digital Tracker

Thanks Dan for this update. It will indeed be interesting to track the shifting lives of theses leopards.

Christa Blessing
Master Tracker

Thanks for the very interesting description of the different female leopards’ territories.

Francesca Doria
Master Tracker

Fantastic blog on these wonderful queens! They are all special but it’s always a treat to read about the Mashaba female, and of course , each of them going on and raising cubs to independence. Thank you!

Thanks Francesca. You’re right, its very special!

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

Thank you so much for the update Dan, I’ve been waiting for this – it’s really nice to see their territories on a map. When I came in November, on my last game drive on 21st we joined Dean in a sighting of an unknown female leopard in a tree down in the SW. As soon as I saw the photo of Nzuthini I recognised her! – I’ve recently been editing very similar ones at home.

Hi Suzanne. We are all very excited to be seeing a “new” female leopard in that area, it’s been relatively vacant for the past year or so from a female leopard point of view. Thanks for the comment.

Valmai Vorster
Master Tracker

Hi Dan, all these female leopards are so beautiful and special in their own environment. I have a soft spot for the Mashaba female as she is the oldest female. I then love watching the Ximungwe female and her male cub playing. Then the Ndzanzeni female who carries the last lineage of the original female. So many females have cubs and have to be so careful that the male leopards do not kill them. I really feel sorry for the females with cubs, because that is an extra worry for her to protect her cubs.

You’re right Valmai, it’s a tough job raising a cub. Just illustrates what amazing animals Leopards are.

Vin Beni
Guest contributor

We also hope the Ndzandzeni Female bears one more litter to extend the Mother leopard lineage.

Hi Vin. We’re hoping so too.

Irene Henkes
Digital Tracker

Hi Dan. You say 6 is a little old for raising another litter. But is that really too old already?

Lisa Antell
Digital Tracker

All of these females are gorgeous! And of course, it gives me great pleasure that I have seen 6 of these girls in person! Absolutely wonderful to see all doing well.

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Dan, Thanks for this update. First and foremost, it is incredible that there are so many Leopards in residence on the Londolozi reserve! It is a testament to the environment that the Varty family and other Sabi properties have created. We are always interested in how the names are chosen. Who get’s to choose?

Hi Micheal and Terri. The names are usually chosen by the ranger and tracker teams. We come together once a leopard has reached independence and decide on a suitable name. The name is then passed on to an organisation called Panthera who then approve it.

Mary Beth Wheeler
Guest contributor

Great article, Dan! Looking forward to see them all in April!

We are looking forward to having you, Mary.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Dan, this was the perfect follow up to the male leopards of Londolozi posted a while ago. Even more exciting for me is that I’ve seen the majority of these females during my last trip there as well as Ntsumi in the property south of you. I believe Ntsumi’s female cub has reached independence now, or soon so it will be interesting to see where she ends up. Know that your photos and blogs about Londolozi’s leopard population is much appreciated and although we shouldn’t become attached to wild animals, it’s difficult not to whilst hearing the various stories. Thank you!

Hi Denise. Thank you for your comment. Indeed it will be very interesting where the young female of Nstumi ends up. We hope she doesn’t go too far.

Great post – I need to keep it as a reference! One question, what happened to the Finfoot Female? Wasn’t she the sister of the Nkuwa Female? I remember the two were successfully raised to independence. Has she just moved off Londolozi in one direction or another?

Hi Holly. The Finfoot female moved into the southern parts of the Sabi Sand. I believe one of the reasons was her slightly bigger sister (the Nkuwa Female) filled the territory she found herself in.

Leslie Backus
Explorer

Thanks for the interesting post. Is it known if the Tamboti Female’s last cub survived? I have some lovely photos of them together and have always wondered.

Bob and Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Wow such a distant day from when we were fortunate to see one leopard in aweek. The process you have all evolved for habituating young leopards (and truthfully all the wild animals there) to the sights and sounds of us has yielded a treasure trove of photographic opportunities rarely found elsewhere. And then to track and document their genealogy is fascinating. We are the benefactors of your diligence and the pictures we take and share with our families and friends are testaments to your success. Thank you all!

Paul Canales
Master Tracker

I absolutely LOVE this mini-series on the leopards of Londolozi!!

Cally Staniland
Master Tracker

Wonderful to have a clear map of all the female leopards territories and although they will continue to change, I hope that I will get to see at least one of the Londo female leopards in time. It must be almost 40years since I saw my last leopard on Londolozi and that was rather unique then, as there were so few that were comfortable with vehicles or even on the property in those days. Do hope that Ndzandzeni has one last chance of bringing up a cub to continue the lineage 🙏🏻💗

Paul Canales
Master Tracker

Thanks for this survey if the female leopards Dan, and the including the map is super helpful as a reference about their territories. I really love how concluded they blog with the understanding that these amazing female leopards live in worlds if their own!!

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