About the Author

Jess Shillaw

Contributor

Jess was born in Kwazulu/Natal but grew up in Cape Town. Having an innate love for all things wild but getting to spend little time in the bush while growing up, she headed straight for the Lowveld after school. She completed a guiding ...

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15 Comments

on What Does a Leopard and The Leopard Orchid Have in Common?

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Marc Grawunder
Explorer

Does anyone know who that male leopard is on the old photo with the Londolozi sign ?

Jess Shillaw
Contributor

Hi Marc, it is the Camp Pan Male.

Marc Grawunder
Explorer

Thanks for the info,Jess! I remember him. He had that special relationship with one of his sons.

Valmai Vorster
Master Tracker

Jess very interesting your story on the leopard orchid, and it is a beautiful flower as well. So we’ll established using the tree as a host to grow on. The pic of the leopard is a beautiful male leopard, is it the Flat rock male. The name Londolozi, meaning ” protector of all living things” is so perfect, because you do protect all living things.

Jess Shillaw
Contributor

Hi Valmai, thank you! The leopard next to the sign is the Camp Pan Male.

Christa Blessing
Master Tracker

A beautiful blog, Jess.
Leopards are for me the most beautiful animals and orchids are one my favorite flowers/ plants. I love the one on Tree Camps’ deck. It is indeed the perfect symbol for Londolozi, this leopard orchid with its leopard face.
And the photo of the leopard walking past Londolozi’s road sign is just great.

William Paynter
Digital Tracker

Flowers are one of our ecosystems most beautiful plants as well as useful . Thanks for bringing the leopard orchid to my attention .

Francesca Doria
Master Tracker

Hi Jess, thank you for this very interesting blog on these lovely plants, orchids are among the most wanted vegetables as leopards are most wanted animals, unfortunately to wear as well. The similitude between this special plant and your activity is remarkable. I love orchids and hope they will be no longer trafficked, only cultivated, as leopards fur is no more sold in many countries in favour of fake coat

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

Was it the Marthly male?

Jess Shillaw
Contributor

Hi Suzanne, it is the Camp Pan Male.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Jess, thank you for highlighting this beautiful epiphyte, including traditional uses as well as potential medicinal use.
I remember stopping to admire one of these blooming orchids during a game drive, all the while hoping to find a female leopard rumored to be in the area, when just 5 minutes later she appeared!
The Londolozi logo is distinctive and I appreciate the thought process behind its development. After one’s first visit to this property, you truly under the ethos, protector of all living things.

Leonie De Young
Master Tracker

An interesting blog Jess. Thanks for sharing.

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Jess, Thanks for this story! We love orchids and have seen the Leopard Orchid in the wild at Londolozi! We remember that the Londolozi logo is in the shape of the orchid with the leopard incorporated in it. A brilliant way to showcase the wildlife and plant life together!

Paul Canales
Master Tracker

Fascinating blog Jess, and love the detail about the various values the plant/flowers have!!

Cally Staniland
Master Tracker

Loved the common bond that you have used between the harmonious approach of Londolozi and the leopard orchid Jess 🙏🏻 Apt that the orchid generally cradles in a V of a tree taking only that which is decaying yet, in return nurturing new life by attracting birds to nest within it. Long may Londolozi continue to show the world that it’s possible to enjoy our animal kingdom without encroaching on ‘their space’. Super blog thanks Jess ❤️

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