Involved Leopards

Senegal Bush 3:3 Male

Senegal Bush 3:3 Male

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Maxim's 5:3 Male

Maxim's 5:3 Male

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Mawelawela 3:4 Male

Mawelawela 3:4 Male

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Flat Rock 3:2 Male

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

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Nweti 4:2 Male

Nweti 4:2 Male

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White Dam 2:2 Male

White Dam 2:2 Male

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Mahlahla 2:1 Male

Mahlahla 2:1 Male

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About the Author

Dan Hirschowitz

Ranger

Dan developed his love for the African bush whilst growing up on a family run farm in the Kwa-Zulu Natal midlands. Growing up in the bushveld he was surrounded by wildlife and finds his passion in what nature has to offer. After completing ...

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16 Comments

on Leopard Territories Update: Part 1- Males

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Marc Grawunder
Explorer

Leopard dynamics are always fascinating. Thanks for the update.

Francesca Doria
Master Tracker

Mesmerising animals! They are grace and power in person. I wonder if too little room was left in general for all these great predators, also considering what happened to the Tsalala female. I hope leopards will have a better luck and pass on the Mother Leopard’s genpool

Irene Henkes
Senior Digital Ranger

Thank you Dan! It is often difficult visualizing who is where (and why…). This really helps!

Cyndy Beardsley
Digital Ranger

Wow ! The shot of the Nweti Male and a buffalo kissing noses is a phenomenal photo! Thank you

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Dan, Your update on the male leopards is fantastic! We are amazed at the amount of leopards currently in the Londolozi reserve – that’s a lot to keep track of. It’s a testament to the long-term conservation protocols developed by the Varty family! Thanks!

Christa Blessing
Master Tracker

Thanks for the update on the interesting moves and whereabouts of the male leopards.
The photo of the leopard and the buffalo „kissing“ each other is great!

Lisa Antell
Digital Tracker

I just love the male leopards! There is always action and drama when they are around. Been very privileged to see both Flat Rock and Senegal Bush males in 2019. Hope that they stay well for a long time!

Marcia Parker
Senior Digital Ranger

Interesting update! Love Dean’s photo of the Mahlahla male.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Fantastic update Dan! It’s fascinating to follow their movements through the Londolozi territory. You’ve mentioned the Ximungwe young male has now carved out a bit of territory in the north but I’m curious as to where the Tortoise Pan has settled in, if he is still in the area.
Looking forward to the next installment-the females.

Jutta Mielke Nestle
Guest contributor

Very interesting story.

Valmai Vorster
Digital Tracker

Hi Dan, thank you for sharing this map and showing us the territory of each male leopard. Now we can go back to the map and check when we get updates on the males. Senegal bush male is my favorite, but looking at these other males, they are absolutely beautiful and huge. Stunning foto of the Nweti male and buffalo kissing noses.

Stephen Torgesen
Explorer

Thank you. Looking forward to the update for the females. Is there a male leopard named Mawelawela that has territory near Londolozi?

Bob and Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Dan, great blog! Really interesting and we are looking forward to the female segment. Wish the title photo was selectable to add to our individual collections … it’s a compelling photo!

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

Thanks very much for that, Dan, I’ve been getting quite confused as to how the males’ territories connect/ overlap . On my trip last week I was fortunate enough to see the Senegal Bush and Nweti males for the 1st time and I also saw Flat Rock again. Looking forward to the Part 2 for the females.

Michael Fleetwood
Digital Tracker

Thanks for this dynamics update Dan! Really love these kinds of articles! Am wondering what the origins of the Mahlahla Male’s name is? Thanks again and looking forward to the female portion!

Cally Staniland
Master Tracker

Fascinating read Dan, at least the leopard dynamics seem to take on a much less dramatic manner than the lions of late ! Non the less each day seems to bring a new twist and certainly a great supply of viewings for all to enjoy 🙏🏻

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