Involved Leopards

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

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About the Author

Pete Thorpe

Field Guide

Right from his very first bush trip at the age of four, Pete was always enthralled by this environment. Having grown up in the Middle East, Pete’s home-away-from-home has always been a bungalow in the Greater Kruger National Park, where his family had ...

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30 Comments

on A Single Day On Safari in August

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Francesca Doria
Explorer

Hello Pete, I once heard male lions roaring close it’s almost unbearable for the ears but what a sound! You can hear who’s the king… a magical journey through wildlife with beautiful leopards and impala zebra giraffe…and the rhino. It’s always a pleasure to see how confident they are, a rare thing nowadays. They can stay in peace in Londolozi.

Joan Schmiidt
Master Tracker

Pete, I loved all the photos, especially the rhino🤗

Victoria Auchincloss
Digital Tracker

A wonderful start to the week. Lions roaring always make you think they are coming to dinner. Can’ ever see too many leopards and giraffes are always a favorite. thank you Victoria

Lisa Antell
Explorer

I have heard lions brawling and fighting right next to me…..but I have never had lions roaring territorially right next to me! Hopefully, one day in the future on a safari, I will get that opportunity!

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

Territorial roars l think are best audible/done during the evenings or early mornings when the timing/conditions are favourable for that mass advertising of strength/presence

Linda Mansell
Explorer

All that excitement in a day of a ranger …. amazing experience to be going along with you. Thanks Peter and to you all … my wildlife experience in the U.K. today was catching a horsefly before it could bite me. Very satisfying!

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

Hi Linda!

I’m relieved to hear you saved yourself before the horsefly got the better of you… Thanks for the comments.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Oh for a day on Safari…..! Your blog clicked my memory of driving back to camp after a sultry sundowner when we heard the first roar, then the second lion joined followed by the third. Driving a bit further we came upon the trio, posed in a triangle , each seeming to outdo the others with their sound intensity. Parked just a few meters away, we sat mesmerized, the Landy vibrating as we experienced this concert in the dark. I recorded the sound but it no way was the same intensity. I’m looking forward to more “goosebumps “ moments on my next trip in addition to all the other amazing things to view.

Kay Schmid
Digital Ranger

Pete, this piece is so beautifully written. I was right there with you, all day. Thank you.

Christa Blessing
Senior Digital Ranger

Burchell is right: Nothing can be compared to being in the African bush with its smells and sounds and sights.
Beautiful pictures, Pete

Kara Taylor
Digital Tracker

The perfect day!

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

We were once lucky enough to be surrounded by 3 Majingilane males roaring together in the dark – an experience we will never forget! The quote at the end, Pete – is that who the Burchell’s zebra and starling are named after?

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

Hi Suzanne,
Indeed it is the same Mr Burchell.

Darlene Knott
Digital Tracker

You are so right, Pete! That sound goes right through your body! We love listening to lions roar! Then when you hear a response, wow!!!

Trish Monck
Digital Tracker

Love the pic of the muddy Rhino! You are so lucky, can I come and jump in the vehicle with you?!

Pauli Bakker
Digital Ranger

Wow Pete ..all in one day!…. thankyou for such lovely sightings….. always look forward to the wonderful informative wildlife reports from you guys….keep safe….

Paul Canales
Senior Digital Ranger

Thank you Pete for this wonderful account of “A Single Day on Safari in August,” and it happens to be my birthday!! What a treat!!

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

We hope you had a very happy birthday, Paul!

Paul Canales
Senior Digital Ranger

Thank you, it was lovely!!

Mary Beth Wheeler
Guest contributor

Mr. Burchell was spot on! Thank you, Pete!

Cally Staniland
Explorer

What a perfect day Pete!! Would give anything to enjoy a day like that right now. In fact would b happy even without the roaring lion and fab sightings. Just the expanse of Africa around me would b just fine🙏💕

Maxine Thomson
Explorer

Pete… you seriously have a magnificent job! You paint such vivid pictures with your words.I adore the photo of the sunset! Hope you’re having a fantastic week so far!

Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Lovely blog Pete. Love the quote. Africa is undescribable. You’ve got to experience it for yourself. Nothing compare.

Wendy Macnicol
Digital Tracker

Hi Pete. Lovely pic of the Giraffe and Water Buck and Impala. However, I took the sunset pic with the Marula tree. Love silhouettes! Thank you. Keep them coming! Wendy M

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

Hi Wendy,

I’m glad you enjoyed the shots. Did you capture a similar sunset shot too?

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

The interaction of various specie to one zone exhibits the symbiotic liasons that exist btwn the animals as they dont clash resoure wise seeing they have constrasting dietary preferences.As such all defence senses are rolled into one common purpose this boosts their safety and ability to spook carnivores or any threats

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

Awesome rhino bull image whc has a 1000 messages

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

Giraffe when feeding l have observed that ,female prefer more open savanna whereas males will usually forage deeper into the thickets ,l reckon this is a resource partition skill so that the sexes dont clash.Males heads are also able to tilt upwards at more angles than females this aids their reach onto food.

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

Impala , waterbuck,wildbeest and zebra seamlessly cohabit bcz they have constrasting feeding patterns.zebra muzzle built for cropping upper coarse grass , Wildbeest muzzle typically with other ruminants is adapted for lower grass.waterbuck as well dont clash with their prefered hangout friends.As such they combine defence senses.Dentition wise as well the species have different teeth types.Diastema lacks in zebra since they aint ruminants but wildbeest do have a diastema.

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

Zebra pic is trully lovely.I have observed that zebra as a result of feeding on upper coarse grass which has very high degrees of seeds makes them to seemingly sneeze a lot while feeding.Personally l feel or must l say suspect the pollen from seeds makes them sneeze.

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