Involved Leopards

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

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Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male

Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male

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About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Alumni

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

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28 Comments

on A Shared Experience With an Incredible Leopard

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Amy, it is so nice to read one of your blogs again. This is also a sad and difficult time for many people, but there is hope for the future. We will hopefully appreciate the lessons that nature teach us. Live a simpler life.

Hi Marinda. So lovely to hear from you too. Absolutely, as you say, a difficult time for many but there is ALWAYS room for hope!

Valerie Grosset
Explorer

Very beautiful and touching story of this leopard …

Vin Beni
Guest contributor

Thanks for filling in some blanks in the history. We have seen the Nkoveni female on a few occasions.

What a terribly sad news… Another part of the legendary Mother lineage is gone. A day for mourning.

Joan Schmiidt
Master Tracker

Amy, what a wonderful blog – I have seen the Dudley Leopard when we were there in 2014, Nkoveni Female in 2014🤗. We have been to Londolozi in 2011, 2014 ,2017, 2018, and hopefully 2020 celbrate our 50th wedding anniversary, Sept 5: I hope we get to go?

Hi Joan. Congratulations in advance for that very special milestone! I too hope that you’ll be able to get to Londolozi and if not in September, then certainly at the next earliest opportunity. What is good to know is that the leopards will most certainly be there to welcome you whenever your trip happens.

Wendy Macnicol
Digital Tracker

Dear Amy. How lovely to hear from you again. What a sad story about this wonderful leopard. Wonder if he has left any progeny on Londolozi? It would be interesting to know. His grandmother too was a very special leopard. Everything of the best to you, Amy! Wendy M

Hi Wendy. From scat samples collected by Panthera, it’s been confirmed that he is the father of the Piccadilly female. She is sometimes seen on the eastern side of Londolozi in the region of the Sand River. Nice to know that he has offspring still seen today. All the best, Amy

Ann Richardson Berg
Senior Digital Ranger

Hello Amy, I was very touched by your beautiful story of Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male leopard. It was sad that he didn’t make it after the fight. It was interesting to read that he wanted to live with his grandmother and that they also shared meals together. I think it is interesting that they as we have different personalities. It is easy to forget that.
I agree with you now we have time to reflect and hopefully when this has past we understand more what is truly importent in our lifes. I think you wrote it very good. Here comes a question;
Is he father to any of the present leopards on Londolozi today?
Thank you for sharing!

Hi Ann. Yes, such an interesting leopard! From scat samples collected by Panthera, it’s been confirmed that he is the father of the Piccadilly female. She is sometimes seen on the eastern side of Londolozi in the region of the Sand River. Nice to know that he has offspring still seen today. Thanks so much, Amy

Kara Taylor
Senior Digital Ranger

It is unbelievable what this Leopard overcame to thrive. It’s a true story of resilience. Animals have so much more depth and intelligence then we can ever know.

Absolutely Kara! Spot on.

Victoria Auchincloss
Digital Tracker

for all of you who shepherd us around to see all animals, the animals must almost like good friends. I can only imagine how sad it is to lose one, even it is the law of the jungle. thank you for sharing. Victoria

Darlene Knott
Digital Tracker

Amy, that was such a beautiful tale to share despite the sad ending! Thanks so much for letting us ‘sit in with you two’ while you relived this moment in time.

Lisa Antell
Explorer

What a sad story about a fascinating leopard!

Judith Guffey
Digital Tracker

Love “the leopards of Londolozi”

Brian Everitt
Digital Ranger

Wow absolutely beautiful blog Amy on this amazing male leopard what a Warrior

Irene Henkes
Explorer

How nice to hear from you Amy! That was a long time ago. This leopard sounds like a very singular guy, thanks for the story, so we met him. Hope he left some progeny…………………

Hi Irene. From the scat samples collected by the organisation Panthera, it’s been confirmed that he is the father of the Piccadilly female. She is sometimes seen on the eastern side of Londolozi in the region of the Sand River. Nice to know that he has offspring still seen today. Thanks so much, Amy

Adriel Souza
Explorer

sad for dudley 🙁

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

So good to read another of your blogs- I’ve missed them but have been following you through your Wild Again page. I’ve never seen the Dudley male but I feel a sense of him through your words-strong, tenacious and loyal to his grandmother. Death comes to all of us and so it is how we choose to live between birth and the end of life that defines us as well as all living creatures. Thank you for another thought provoking blog and keep well.

Hi Denise. Thanks for your kind words and grateful to still be connected. Yes as you say, the amazing paradox of life being that the more we accept our mortality the more fully we live. Keep well!

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Thank you for sharing that story Amy. We are happy to hear from you! It’s amazing and wonderful to us that the lineage and interactions of the leopards that are documented, help make the stories richer. Hope you are staying safe!

Hi Michael and Terri. So good to hear from you too! You’re right, being able to identify the leopards and thus understand their social dynamics adds a whole new dimension to a safari and understanding the animals in general. I’m glad you’ve been able to see and learn about so many of them yourselves. I am safe and well thank you. I hope you are too! All the best and hope you’re back in Africa sooner rather than later.

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

Thank you for sharing this story Amy.

Paul Canales
Senior Digital Ranger

What an incredible and beautiful story. And I particularly love your insights and learnings from this experience. So much to reflect on and value. Thank you Amy.

Tammy Hynes
Explorer

I really wish you had of helped the leopard that the lioness attacked. I don’t believe there creatures there our co planet partners and we very much need our partners to keep earth aon a even balance. Maybe if we didn’t call them creatures, beasts, animals the next generation may have more respect for them because right now the respect level is awful. I will always consider man more of a creature a beast than any animal and man is more destructive, cruel,harmful to others and the planet

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