About the Author

Sean Cresswell

Safari Guide

Sean is one of the humblest rangers you are likely to meet. Quietly going about his day, enriching the lives of the many guests he takes out into the bush, it is only when he posts a Week in Pictures or writes an ...

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13 Comments

on Long Toes and Long Necks: Jacana and Ostrich Chicks

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Frances Fearnhead
Member
Guest

With a bit of imagination, that last paragraph really made me laugh!!! 😂

Jill Larone
Member
Guest

Thanks for a very interesting blog Sean, and great to hear that 2 of the Jacana chicks survived to adulthood! I’m really hoping that the 4 remaining Ostrich chicks have the same good fortune. Does the female Jacana not usually stay to help incubate and protect the chicks?

Sean Cresswell
Safari Guide

Hi Jill, we are hoping for the same good fortune too!

Good question, and the answer is no she does not, as the Jacana are polyandrous meaning that once the female has laid her eggs she starts seeking out a new male to repeat the process, and has no further role in the development of her clutch; that responsibility rests solely on the male. This works well as he is the smaller (and lighter) of the two adults, giving him a better ability to traverse the floating lilies with the chicks to avoid any danger. Nature is just incredible!

Jenny
Member
Guest

Hysterical thought Sean! Thanks for such an informative blog about the survival of Lily Plodder babes and what a great Dad!

Debbie and Frank Kohlenstein
Member
Guest

So wonderful to hear about the African Jacana chicks we saw while there in May. Looking for them every day when we headed out for our adventures was so special. And then to spot them tiptoeing out on the lilies following dad put such a smile on our faces. Reading your entries, Sean, takes us back to our special time at Varty Camp. Thank you!

Sean Cresswell
Safari Guide

Great memories, Debbie and Frank! Keep well

Sharon Blackburn
Member
Guest

Wonderful post! It is the wildlife, large and small, and the plants and insects that make observing nature such a joy! Thank you for reminding that each one has a life story worth telling! Ending with the foot size comparison was brilliant!

Henry
Member
Guest

Nice article Sean. As you know I relate well to the Jacana! By the way how big would my feet be at 1.95m tall? 🙂

Sean Cresswell
Safari Guide

Great to hear from you, H! Yes, a solid liking to the bird… After careful calculations I can conclude your foot size would be 1,15m (3’77”ft) which might be well over the size 50 shoe limit! That, you can raise your bat to, Henry!

Wendy MacNicol
Member
Guest

Personally I would give my eye teeth to see a 6’1″ Jacana Sean! The mind boggles…..
Wendy M

Sean Cresswell
Safari Guide

Yes, Wendy, it would be great. Not confident about my driving capacity though with those clown shoes…

Brenda Quatember
Member
Guest

Loved this , have followed the ostrich story from the beginning and so enjoy the updates.
Jacana dad amazing, what a privilege for you to witness, nature never fails to amaze,
Thank you!

Jill Larone
Member
Guest

Thanks for your response Sean, and yes, nature really is incredible!

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