Tony Goldman is a long-standing guest and friend of Londolozi. Many of you will recognize his name from the Londolozi Blog, as his stunning photographs have featured a number of times before in a variety of posts.

Tony was back for another visit recently, and yet again was kind enough to present us with a number of his pictures for publication on our blog.

We present the first of his posts today.

Enjoy…

Collared SUnbird TG

The small are just as important as the large. A collared sunbird, one of the more common sunbird species at Londolozi, takes a moment to peer towards the camera. This is a female, as the males have a distinctive purple band underneath their chins.

Bv3i1409 Copy

Two of the Lowveld’s iconic and ubiquitous bird species, the lilac-breasted roller and the red-billed hornbill, in the same photograph. While male and female LBRs are pretty much indistinguishable, the hornbill can clearly be identified as a male, as the lower mandible is black close to its base. Females have an all red lower mandible and a slightly narrower beak.

Bv3i1638 Copy

Another common hornbill species of the area, this time the Grey version. These birds can be told apart from the other hornbills at a distance by their slightly different flying style; a much slower flapping motion. Like the red-billed hornbill, male and female grey hornbills can be told apart by their bills. Females, like this one, have a cream base to the bill and red towards the tip, whilst the males have a much greyer bill with a more prominent casque on the upper mandible.

Bv3i1687 Copy

A white-tailed mongoose, one of Londolozi’s nocturnal creatures. The largest mongoose species we find here, their large bushy tails are an immediate giveaway when one spots them rummaging around in the grass, looking for arthropods to eat.

Bv3i1807 Copy

One of only two shrike species in Southern Africa that migrate, the red-backed shrike (this is a male) is only present on Londolozi over the Summer months. As with all the other migrants, these birds have now departed for warmer northern climes as the South African winter tightens its grip.

Bv3i2015 Copy

One of Londolozi’s most beautiful birds is the Malachite kingfisher. Although one would think that such a colourful bird would be easily visible, their diminutive size and the fact that they are often low down, perched on the edge of a reed bed, means that they are often overlooked. This one had caught a large dragonfly – quite a substantial meal for such a small bird.

Bv3i9465 Copy

A white rhino cow and calf share a drink from a waterhole. As the dry season sets in and the quality of the grass starts to deteriorate, the white rhinos will be forced to up their daily intake of food in order to meet their nutritional requirements.

Bv3i9486 Copy

The Mashaba female, one of Londolozi’s most well-known. She has been enthralling guests for a decade (she is ten years old this year), and has thus far raised two cubs to independence; the Nkoveni and Xiimungwe females.

10
Mashaba 3:3 Female
2008 - present

The Mashaba female is currently Londolozi’s best known leopard. Her relaxed nature means she is comfortable around the camps and vehicles.

U
Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
34 sightings by Members
q

Mashaba 3:3 Female

Lineage
Sunsetbend
Identification
markings
Timeline
50 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
5 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist
6
Nkoveni 2:2 Female
2012 - present

A young female that lives to the east and south of camp. Easily recognised by her 2:2 spot pattern she is often to be found in Marula trees.

U
Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
33 sightings by Members
q

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Lineage
Sunsetbend
Identification
markings
Timeline
56 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist
3
Ximungwe 5:3 Female
2015 - present

Having been viewed by vehicles from an early age, this leopard is supremely relaxed around Land Rovers.

U
Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
24 sightings by Members
q

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Lineage
Sunsetbend
Identification
markings
Timeline
30 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
1 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist
Bv3i9569 Copy

The most recognisable behind in the African bush; the waterbuck. These conspicuous white markings on their backsides are said to be a follow-me signal, helping the groups maintain visual contact with each other, particularly when on the run from predators.

Bv3i9692 Copy Copy

A rare close-up of a klipsringer (rock jumper), These small antelopes are among Londolozi’s smallest, and have incredibly limited habitats, being confined solely to the rocky outcrops to which their hooves are adapted. A shot like this is a rarity, as they are relatively skittish creatures, and getting close to them is difficult.

Bv3i9731 Copy

For many, the voice of Africa is not the lion’s roar, but the call of the African fish eagle. Regularly seen soaring high above the Londolozi camps, which line the Sand River, the local pair enjoys unlimited access to a number of prominent pools and waterholes that are packed with bream, barbel and other small species that form the greater part of their diet.

Bv3i9741 Copy

A regal nyala bull listens intently to a disturbance in the bushes nearby. Adapted to living mainly in thicketed areas, nyalas rely heavily on their hearing ability as a defence, as more often than not their vision is obstructed by undergrowth, and limited to only a few metres in front of them.

Bv3i0790 Copy Copy

A leopard will instinctively reduce its profile when honing in on prey, which means lowering its body into its shoulders and flattening its ears. Leopards can stalk forward literally only a foot above the ground, so dense grass cover like this is more than adequate to conceal an approach.

Bv3i1110 Copy Copy

One of the Birmingham males scent-marks with his pre-orbital gland on a tree wisteria. One can see rain droplets on this branch, and it is often after a downpour that territorial creatures will scent mark most actively, knowing that their scent will have been washed away by the rains.

Filed under Photo Journal Wildlife

Involved Leopards

Mashaba 3:3 Female

Mashaba 3:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard

About the Author

Anthony Goldman

Guest contributor

Born in Boksburg , grew up in Benoni matriculated at Benoni High , went to Medical School at Wits.Married for 44 years.I am a cardiologist and practice full -time.My love for the bush first started after a Standard 5 school trip to the ...

View Anthony's profile

8 Comments

on Photographic Journal: The Best of Tony Goldman

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Callum Evans

Another amazing photo journal!! The images of the collared sunbird and the roller and the hornbill are definitely my favourites!

Marinda Drake

Stunning images Tony. Love the white tailed mongoose and Birmingham male. Can hardly believe that the Mashaba female is already 10 years old. She was the first leopard we viewed at Londolozi when she was still the Vomba young female.

Joanne Wadsworth

It’s always a genuine pleasure to review Tony’s images. Because he’s a Facebook friend and through his lens, I’ve learned to truly appreciate wildlife and was introduced to Londolozi. Now both wild life and Londolozi have been stitched into my daily life and happily can’t be undone. Today’s images only begin to scratch the surface of his outstanding body of work….whether in Londolozi, at his home in Florida or the other world-wide trips he’s made. The Mashaba female is his very favorite and I was glad to see a image of her along with the captures shown that just begin to scratch the surface of life at Londolozi. So today I have the pleasure of saluting you both….the superb and remarkable photographer along with the renown and highly noted Londolozi. Deserved accolades.

Lieve Cocquyt

Absolutely love Anthony’s photographs, I look forward to new pictures. Nobody captures the spirit of the leopards the way he does.

Wynn Derr

Beautiful photos Tony, as always! Best, Wynn Derr, California

Mj Bradley

Anthony Goldman takes fabulous photos.. Thank you for sharing them!

Rich Laburn

Awesome pictures as always Tony. Thank you for sharing!

Anthony Goldman

Thanks everyone for the kind comments

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

Sign up for our Newsletters

One moment...
+
Add Profile