Involved Leopards

Tamboti 4:3 Female

Tamboti 4:3 Female

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Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

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Robson's 4:4 Male

Robson's 4:4 Male

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Xidulu 2:3 Female

Xidulu 2:3 Female

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Mashaba 3:3 Female

Mashaba 3:3 Female

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Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

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Piva 3:2 Male

Piva 3:2 Male

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Flat Rock 3:2 Male

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

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Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

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About the Author

Callum Gowar

Field Guide

Growing up in Cape Town, the opposite end of South Africa from its main wildlife areas, didn't slow Callum down when embarking on his ranger training at Londolozi at the start of 2015. He had slowly begun moving north-east through the country anyway, ...

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8 Comments

on Why is a Leopard’s Tail Important?

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Love these informative blogs where we can learn something. Interesting that leopards use the tail as an additional limb.

Ian Hall
Senior Digital Ranger

Super photos, the opening shot really highlights the effectiveness of heavy cropping.

Denise Vouri
Digital Tracker

Fascinating Callum. I had always heard that the white fur underneath a leopard’s tail enabled the youngsters to follow mom. Additionally, it is also used for balance, so my previous lessons are validated by your blog. Wonderful photos accompany your blog.

Tim Barton
Explorer

Thanks for this post Callum. I got several very nice shots last month of the Nkoveni female and her cubs and now the tails I captured make a lot more sense and are even more satisfying to me. Thanks so much!

Sylvain Villeroy De Galhau
Guest Contributor

Thanks Callum for this very interesting blog entry. I noticed that the “bio” of the Xidulu female hasn’t been updated since her passing away.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Sylvain,

Thanks for the head’s up. We’ll update it immediately!
Best regards

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

Animals have far more complex ways of communicating than most people know. I defintely didn’t know about some of the communicative functions, thanks for the clarity!

Darlene Knott
Senior Digital Ranger

Wonderful information, Callum. The photos are beautiful. Love this blog!

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