About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills were well developed, and he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team as a result. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the photographic skills ...

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15 Comments

on A Lion’s Roar: Let’s Discuss

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Kevin
Member
Guest

Elmon, maps and Majingilane? 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍
GREAT blog! Thanks!

Jill Larone
Member
Guest

Hi James, and thank you for an extremely interesting write-up. My reaction, while following one of the Majingilane one morning with Mark and Lucky in Sept. 2013, and hearing him calling to his brothers, was exactly as you described — I was astounded and sat open-mouthed and gaping in complete awe. It was the highlight of my 5 days at Londolozi and an experience I will never forget. There is, in my opinion, nothing more majestic or powerful than seeing a male lion in the wild. I had no idea though, of the distance that their roar could carry or be heard, and I’m astonished at their ability to find each other over such a long distance, especially when only hearing one roar. Absolutely incredible!

Mary Beth Wheeler
Member
Guest

I have been one of those jaw-dropped-open guests on many occasions! One never gets used to it…a sound one feels inside, down to the bones! And there’s nothing quite like waking to the sound of a roaring lion! Thanks, James

Tom Bradley
Member
Guest

Thank you for this explanation and story. When I visited in 2013 we spent a few times with the tailless female so I was glad to have a update on her this recently. She was being followed by a male who we referred to say ‘Wishful thinker”. Tom Imeri our guide told us that she had been searching for her sister who she had not seen in quite a few months. We parked quite close to them and she began to call. Softly at first but then with vigor. I am lucky enough to have several shots of her calling but the most impressive ones came a from deep down. She almost coiled for lack of a better word and let out a strong and long call. It truly came from her toes as the saying goes. Happily for her and for us as well, she received a response and she was quickly up and headed for a family meeting!! We were told that they did indeed meet later that day. One of my partners has it on video and audio. It is spectacular and unforgettable. My best to all.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Tom,
Glad to hear you had such a great experience. The tailless female hasn’t been on Londolozi for a few weeks now, but is still going strong with the fours sub-adults of the pride to the east of our boundary.
When are you next coming for a visit?
Regards

Donna
Member
Guest

Great Blog and very informative.
I always look forward to reading your blogs, the information and knowledge that you provide.
Thank you James

Dave Mills
Member
Guest

Perfect, James. Perfect. Thanks.

MJ
Member
Guest

Thank you for a great blog, James! I am so happy for the research that is going on now.. Panthera with the DNA data bank being started and the information being gathered on all of our wonderful leopards.. I know there is another place doing leopard research also but not in the Sabi Sands.. Ingwe Leopard Project headquartered in the Thabo Tholo is doing some wonderful work also. I enjoy blogs of this nature, it is always a pleasure to learn as well as experience.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Thanks MJ.
I agree, the research currently being conducted is fantastic, and the literature going forward is going to give us a far better understanding about all big cats hopefully…

Guy Redman
Member
Guest

Dear James
That’s for a great article. It’s spot-on in terms of the experiences that I have had with lion Roars. Some time ago I studied the temporal roaring patterns of lions and as part of this study came to experience lion Roars in close range. I cannot explain the feeling. Really makes you feel small and insignificant because of the fear but exciting at the same time. Thanks for the article. Much appreciated.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Thanks for the feedback, Guy.
There’s nothing quite like being right there; it never gets old!

Kim Beasley
Member
Guest

SO interesting!!! I’ve learned some things about lions, thank you so much!!!

Dawn Phillips
Member
Guest

Your descriptive has left me with goosebumps. I am excited beyond words to be visiting Londolozi, and experiencing the magic that you share. Thank you for your articles, they make my day.

Patrik Hutter
Member
Guest

Thanks James, very interesting blog, different of the normal ones, and that is good. I was very lucky to hear Dark Mane and Golden Mane roar together one night when at Londolozi. Unforgettable sound!

Kit Boey
Member
Guest

It was in Londolozi that we had one of our best experiences. it was nightfall and Sandros had us parked infront of two sleepy male lions. suddenly, one of them started roaring. then he got up, and walked, roaring all the way. and we followed until he came towards the vehicle, while roaring, went under us and then next to the vehicle. the vehicle rattled like crazy. wow. that was all we could say over again and again.wow. and i love how you talked about them being able to pinpoint each other so accurately. they are such a smart species.

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