Involved Leopards

Mashaba 3:3 Female

Mashaba 3:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Xinkhova 2:2 Female

Xinkhova 2:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Nkoveni 3:2 Young Female B

Nkoveni 3:2 Young Female B

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Three Rivers 2:2 Female

Three Rivers 2:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Ntomi 3:3 Male

Ntomi 3:3 Male

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Plaque Rock 3:3 Female

Plaque Rock 3:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Three Rivers 2:3 Young Male

Three Rivers 2:3 Young Male

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Xinzele 4:4 Female

Xinzele 4:4 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard

About the Author

Barry Bath

Contributor

Barry grew up in Johannesburg and knew from a young age that he had a true love for the African bush yet it was only after spending several years in the corporate world in Europe, followed by a two year sabbatical of traveling ...

View Barry's profile

17 Comments

on Leopard Cub Update: The Harsh Reality of Raising Cubs

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Babs Putar
Explorer

Hard life for leopard and cheetah mothers. They do not have the protection like lionesses have being in a pride.

Barry Bath
Contributor

Hi Babs, that’s for sure! It is an unrelentless and tough life for them.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Barry, it’s always good to read a report by you and this one is especially timely. After the posting of so many images of leopards a few months ago, I was hopeful that Mashaba would finally be able to raise and launch at least one more cub. At her age it seems doubtful, though not impossible, she will be able to raise any more cubs to independence. All the other cubs were so cute from Xinzele and Nhlanguleni to name but two, but I’ve now learned not to become invested in their possible future to independence, but just enjoy the sightings. For big cats, the success rate of raising their young to independence seems to be shrinking, but then we observe Ximungwe and Nkoveni who have been amazing mothers, so it’s extremely possible that the other younger female leopards will take notes and become successful as well.

Barry Bath
Contributor

Hi Denise, I too was hopeful for the Mashaba Female to raise another cub although it is now seeming less likely. The irony is that she has raised two daughters that have been very successful to date with raising cubs. Happy to hear you enjoyed the update on the leopards.

Francesca Doria
Master Tracker

Maybe there is a too high predators density, especially hyenas, also due to human activity that prefer to hunt big cats. Anyway I’m glad to see that several females raised their cubs successfully, the twins are a real treat. Hopefully the Mother Leopard lineage will continue

Barry Bath
Contributor

Hi Francesca, the high predator density certainly makes it tough for the mother leopards. Fingers crossed the Mother Leopard lineage continues through Ndzanzeni.

Kara Taylor
Master Tracker

An excellent update – I’ve been wondering about the cubs lately. Last visit I wasn’t actually able to see any of the tiny babies but some of the more edging towards independence adults which was lovely.

Barry Bath
Contributor

Hi Kara, the tiny leopard cubs were difficult to see over the past few months while they were still around. We have had a plethora of sightings of the sub-adults so I’m glad you got to spend some quality time with them on your last visit.

Valmai Vorster
Master Tracker

Barry your posts are always full of information and we appreciate it. So sad that so many leopard cubs never make it to adulthood. They are so vulnerable and absolutely gorgeous. So soon the The Three Rivers male cub will also get a new name. Please keep us posted Barry about the dynamics of the leopard cubs.

Vin Beni
Guest contributor

Soft spot in my heart for both the Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female (May be the first leopard I was able to identify) and Mashaba 3:3 Female (Whom I have seen most frequently). Hope to be able to see more offspring from each.

Christa Blessing
Master Tracker

It is always sad when a leopard mother (or any other mother as well, of course) loses a young one or even two.
However, it seems that the Londolozi female leopards are quite successful on the whole, though one would wish that each cub could make it to adulthood. But then there would be a lot more leopards looking for their own territory.

Josh Deans
Explorer

Great write-up with spectacular pictures! Thanks for sharing!

Michael Fleetwood
Digital Tracker

Hi Barry! The Ximungwe Young Male has been named the Ntomi Male? What does that mean/originate from?

Sean Zeederberg
Blog Editor

Hi Michael, in short it means ‘freckle’ in association with the birthmark in his left eye. We will be putting out a post on Monday with more detail.

William Paynter
Master Tracker

Barry, thank you for the wonderful update on the female leopards of Londolozi. Great pictures and information about them and their cubs.

Lisa Antell
Master Tracker

Always so so sad when the females lose their cubs. It makes me wonder if the carrying capacity of the Sabi Sands has been achieved for leopards. The mamas work so so hard to feed and protect their cubs.

Lisa Antell
Master Tracker

They are so wonderful to see, and so hard to lose…..but then again, I guess that the ecosystem cannot really handle too many cats at once! Baby leopards are incredibly special to see in the wild!

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile