The Lion, The Leopards and the Knobthorn | Londolozi Blog

Involved Leopards

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

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Senegal Bush 3:3 Male

Senegal Bush 3:3 Male

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About the Author

Chris Taylor

Ranger

Chris was born and raised in the Kwa-Zulu/Natal Midlands where his family inspired his early passion for the natural world. Exploring Southern Africa as he grew up, this passion was allowed to develop and his curiosity to expand. After high school, Chris spent ...

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15 Comments

on The Lion, The Leopards and the Knobthorn

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Christa Blessing
Digital Tracker

Great story, Chris. And great photos as well.

Chris Taylor
Ranger

Thanks Christa. I hope you are enjoying the Swiss summer!

Francesca Doria
Digital Tracker

Great interaction of big cats! Female leopards often are the losers it seems… do you know if the marauding hyenas ore more often male or female?

Chris Taylor
Ranger

There wouldn’t necessarily be a dominant gender of hyenas around a kill; equal chances of both being there.

Mary Beth Wheeler
Guest contributor

Great blog, Chris! I was there with you!

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

What fantastic sightings you experienced in that 24 hour period-fulfilling any guest’s desire to see a big cat! It seems the Senegal Bush male has moved around his territory easily without any interference from other male leopards. I wonder how he’d fare in trying to steal a kill from the Flat Rock male??

Chris Taylor
Ranger

Hi Denise. You are correct; the Senegal Bush Male has shifted his territory much further north and west into what we would normally consider to be the Flat Rock Males territory. However, we’ve noticed that the Flat Rock male himself is finding little competition north of the river and seems to be ceding more of the southern parts of his territory to the Maxim’s and Senegal Bush males. Perhaps a happy trade off for him given he’s the only male we see in the north now.

Vin Beni
Guest contributor

Very exciting series of events, once again demonstrating the significance of patience, perseverance, and luck.

Jutta Mielke Nestle
Guest contributor

Wonderful leopards, hope to see them again

Valmai Vorster
Digital Tracker

The Senegal bush male is making a habit of stealing the female leopards kill. I feel sorry for the female leopards as they work so hard to kill the impala and then the Senegal bush male comes and steals the kill. He is a magnificent cat and he is my favorite male leopard. So glad the lioness decided to move on and leave the are. Must of been a stunning sight to see all the excitement enfold right in front of you.

Chris Taylor
Ranger

He is indeed making quite a habit out of it! Just off the top of my head I can think of three different occasions where he has stolen a kill from the Nhlanguleni Female alone; not to mention two from the Mashaba Female as well, just in the past 6 weeks.

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Chris, What an exciting day of sightings you had! It looks like the only one that missed out on a meal was the lioness! Great video too! It’s incredible to see how the leopards can hoist their kills in the trees!

Lisa Antell
Senior Digital Ranger

Leopard daily drama……always fascinating! Where are Finfoot and Nkuwa now? Any signs of Nhulanguleni having another litter of cubbies?

Sean Zeederberg
Blog Editor

The Finfoot Female has moved further south and is being seen on Sabi Sabi. THe Nkuwa Female is resident on Marthly and is seen every now and then. The Nhlanguleni Female gave birth about two months ago but sadly those cubs were only seen once and we believe she has lost them. With a bit of luck she could be pregnant again as she has been mating with a number of the males.

Pauli Bakker
Digital Ranger

Thanks so much Chris for these brilliant sightings…especially of the two Birmingham pride males….such a brilliant coalition for such a long time… they need a good meal…hope they can hold on to their territory until the subs disperse….. I find it such a shame that it’s necessary to spot light predators and prey animals at night though… I realise that they cope and have accepted the glare but I still think it’s an intrusion and unnecessary…have been on quite a few night game drives myself and always felt it not warranted as so much wildlife can usually be found in daylight hours with a very good guide…..thanks again for your updates…take care

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