The Interesting Life of Squirrels | Londolozi Blog

About the Author

Kirst Joscelyne

Ranger

At less than a year old, Kirst went to her family’s hut in the Greater Kruger National Park, and has been fortunate enough to continue to go there ever since. Sharing a passion for the bush with her family, led to countless trips ...

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19 Comments

on The Interesting Life of Squirrels

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Victoria Auchincloss
Digital Tracker

I love the squirrels of Londolozi! They are wonderful to see and hear when alarm calling about danger approaching. The volume of noise they make in comparison to their size is remarkable! Victoria

Thank you for sharing this with us. What a sweet story of such cute little creatures. Nice photos as well. My nieces and I enjoyed this story very much. My niece just so happens to be eight years old said that was sad that is as long as they live is her age. Very interesting little tid bit. Thank you and much respect and appreciation from NC.

Joan Schmiidt
Master Tracker

Kirst, I loved all squirrel🤗

Francesca Doria
Senior Digital Ranger

Nice blog! I can’t help comparing them to “our” red squirrels there are many things in common

Michele Baker
Explorer

If the dominant male squirrel is successful mating with several females, how does he then divide his time to help care for several sets of kittens once born? I enjoyed the article and thank you for the opportunity to ask a question.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Michele,
I’m answering for Kirst here (who has more squirrel knowledge than me) but I think there is usually only a single breeding pair. If there do happen to be more than one female who breeds, it’s likely she will look after the young while the male defends the territory.
Best regards

Michele Baker
Explorer

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond!

Ashely Ndebele
Senior Digital Ranger

informative indeed.most appreciated

Valmai Vorster
Senior Digital Ranger

Good story Kirst on the squirrels and very interesting. I am sure not many people know to much about them. They are very cute and very agile, always on the go with endless energie. I ‘ve learn’t something new today and that is, that the little ones are called kittens, and also that the scent is on all of them through grooming each other.

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Thank you for highlighting this small, seemingly unimportant rodent, the tree squirrel. I’ve noticed there, as well as here in Northern California, when threatened or not happy, they they will chatter at incredible decibels. Between the squirrels and monkeys, often the predators are outed before they have a good hunting opportunity. Sampson, my resident Eastern Grey Squirrel, kept me entertained during the worst months of SIP, a little rust/gray package of fur with an uncharacteristically thin tail, rushing to the back door in the hopes of scoring a few peanuts each morning. His family is habituated to this area, living in the towering redwoods or palm trees, traversing the neighborhood in search of nuts, seeds, fruits, etc. At one time this was an area of tree farming and vegetable fields but growing population demands pushed developers to build houses- and so the result is tree squirrels living with us, mostly peacefully.

Christa Blessing
Digital Tracker

Thanks Kirst, for this interesting information about squirrels. They are really cute animals.

Stephen Torgesen
Explorer

What is the status of the Sparta female and her sub adult daughter?

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Stephen,
We don’t know as we don’t see her on Londolozi anymore…

Paul Canales
Digital Tracker

I love this post Kirst! Here in Northern California, we predominantly have the western grey squirrel (sciurus greseus) and the eastern fox squirrel (scirus niger), and their behaviors are endlessly fascinating. I live in an area blessed with lots of trees, and these little characters are abundant and adorable. Some find them pesky, but I am grateful for their natural presence in an otherwise urban environment. Thanks again!

Ian Hall
Master Tracker

What an informative article, must admit to a tendency to take them for granted, especially as they are so globally spread – and the more interesting bigger species.

But just think how many forests they’ve inadvertently planted – and that’s a good thing

Joanne Lofthouse
Digital Tracker

Great blog today, one never really knows much about squirrels. With that being said, we haven’t heard much about the Tsalala female and her cub, do you have any news about them? Thanks

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Kirst, Thanks for the interesting story on the squirrels! The amount to learn about all the diverse wildlife within your sight as a Londolozi Ranger never ceases to amaze us and thanks for the great images too!

Cindy Hauert
Explorer

On my visits to Londolozi I always noticed how guides and trackers paid attention to squirrels when they were alarm calling. Sometimes it seems they were just being silly, but sometimes we found leopards! Ask Sersant, a great tracker, to demonstrate his perfect mimic of a squirrel alarm call!

Cally Staniland
Digital Tracker

Great read Kirst, love these comical, busy little creatures ❤️. Super to learn a little more about their habits. The last one I saw in the KNP was splayed out on our veranda trying to cool himself down and wasn’t moving for anyone…we had to step over him/her each time we went inside. 😂

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