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Nick Sims

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Nick always had a love for nature. Growing up in Johannesburg, the annual family trip to the bush (particularly the Kruger Lowveld region of South Africa) became an escape from city life. When he and his brother weren't physically in the bush, they ...

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on How do Leopards Choose Their Territories ?

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Interesting Nick. It is the same with lions, they establish their territories where there are more prey.

Mary Beth Wheeler
Guest contributor

Fascinating explanation, Nick! Leopard ‘politics’ are very dynamic and it’s always a treat to read about their lives. And knowing the family relationships makes it even more interesting to follow.

Joan Schmiidt
Digital Tracker

Nick, I hope I see the Tortiose Pan male on our next trip in 2020

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

I’ve always wondered about the territory issues. I’ve observed many scenarios of scent marking, but how effective is that in the big picture? It seems interlopers from other reserves pay no attention and try to make themselves at home. I understand that successfully raised female cubs have a better chance of sharing territory with their mother, whilst the males may have to leave if their father or other senior male forces them out. So much to learn from them…..

Joanne Wadsworth Kelley
Master Tracker

Nick you have shown us excellent images and backed it up with interesting information. In the end all I hope for is for the abundance of leopards to flourish in Londolozi, especially by keeping those Cubs alive! Their habits, tolerances and territorial movements are fascinating. I would imagine mapping their shifting territories can become outdated sooner than liked…a bit frustrating after doing all the work.

Jutta Mielke Nestle
Guest contributor

Wow, that is an interesting input about the Leopards at Londolozi.

Bob & Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Excellent discussion Nick! As you say, “The leopard dynamics at Londolozi are always in a state of flux, with subtle factors constantly at play”!!! We didn’t realize that leopards of the same sex cause the big territorial skirmishes. Fascinating!

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