About the Author

Chris Taylor

Ranger

Chris was born and raised in the Kwa-Zulu/Natal Midlands where his family inspired his early passion for the natural world. Exploring Southern Africa as he grew up, this passion was allowed to develop and his curiosity to expand. After high school, Chris spent ...

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13 Comments

on How do Birds Navigate their Migrations?

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Fascinating Chris. I wonder if we will ever be able to understand nature completely. It is so complex. On a lighter note, I can almost believe the old theory that birds hibernate, as I feel like hibernating in the cold weather.

Ian Hall
Digital Tracker

How do birds know how to build a nest, is a question that I ask myself every Spring.

Darlene Knott
Digital Tracker

Very interesting observations! Thanks for sharing all the theories, Chris! The strongest theory seeming to be the third, the magnetic fields. Birds are fascinating!

Dina Petridis
Senior Digital Ranger

I lately heard that some birds adapt to climate change and fly to the SE of England instead of flying down to Africa as there they get plenty of food and nice weather (from a biologist studying migration)

Joan Schmiidt
Digital Tracker

Chris, last year we saw a broad billed roller. Santos was our driver and Exon was our guide. I love the birds of Londolozi and photographed many – of course none of the people with me want pictures of birds!

Victoria Auchincloss
Senior Digital Ranger

When we lived we often saw birds that had migrated from Africa and other points. We did not discover from whence they came until we were at Londolozi and recognized several birds we saw in our summer. They have to have something in their DNA to help. Victoria

Johanna Browne
Explorer

Chris, Great article! Thank you for bringing this up. I believe the later as all animals follow the electromagnetic lines within the Earth grid which run every six feet, north and south and then east and west. For instance when an animal dies the Detrimental energy will build up along these lines to attract vultures, beetles, ants etc… to come clean things up. It will also cause odd growth patterns in trees if it is too detrimental. Where beneficial build up will attract more wildlife and a healthier environment. Elephants and whales follow these lines as well. There is more information about these lines at Biogeometry.com.

Dear Chris, your article is really so interesting. Birds’ migration is one of the most fascinating questions of the animal world. And it is just amazing how these tough little birds can cover such immense distances twice a year. Sadly, so many of them get killed on their long journeys because of mankind’s stupidity and maybe ignorance of these really “phenomenal migrations. “

Joanne Wadsworth Kelley
Master Tracker

Fascinating migrating options. However the birds know/learn to migrate, it never ceases to amaze me how FAR they successfully fly. Incredible!

Bob and Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Fun blog Chris! An equally perplexing conundrum is how one honeybee relates the distant source of a patch of wildflower pollen to the rest of the hive thru unspoken twitches, spins and flicks of its tail!!! We know how it happens but we don’t know the meaning of each gesture! Nature is amazing!

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Fascinating Chris! I’ve always been curious as to how certain birds migrate over long stretches of water – what about food, water, rest? Arctic Tern for example…. also, how do they know where to go? Are they ever lost? So many questions that have no real answers but this is what nature gives us – a bit of mystery that keeps us interested.

Andrew and Daniel Bolnick
Digital Tracker

Chris truly this is one of the many wonders of life on earth. Not only do they migrate thousands of miles but in many instances go back to exactly where they were born. Totally fascinating. I also think your third theory seems most logical. Thank you for raising this topic.

Michael and Terri Klauber
Guest contributor

Chris, Thanks for the special lesson on migrations! You must have done a ton of research and it sounds like there is still a lot more to do. We had never considered magnetic fields helping the birds find their way. Wondering how they know “when” to go now!

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