Involved Leopards

Tamboti 4:3 Female

Tamboti 4:3 Female

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Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

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Inyathini 3:3 Male

Inyathini 3:3 Male

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Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

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About the Author

Pete Thorpe

Field Guide

Right from his very first bush trip at the age of four, Pete was always enthralled by this environment. Having grown up in the Middle East, Pete’s home-away-from-home has always been a bungalow in the Greater Kruger National Park, where his family had ...

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10 Comments

on The Week in Pictures #316

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Great pics this week Pete. Love the zebra against the setting sun. Lovely to see the wildebeest babies. Nice pics of the zebra foal and Tambotie female.

Irene Henkes
Explorer

Hi, interesting pics! Just some questions……….
– when do baby wildebeest start eating grasses?
– here in Europe, the Egyptian goose is going rampant. Probably let loose by some idiot and there are not enough natural enemies here. Who eats them at your end of the world?
– I love the four rhinos. A family group, you think?

Love, Irene

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

Hi Irene,

– Wildebeest calves being to graze at roughly four weeks of age.
– Egyptian geese can fall victim to many different predators out in the bush. To list a few: leopard, jackals, genets, large eagles, certain snakes. They seem to thrive in semi-rural environments – I have seen huge populations of them in the winelands around Stellenbosch, outside Cape Town.
– The four rhinos were not necessarily all related. White rhinos often form small groups consisting of a cow and her most recent calf, sometimes accompanied by an older, unrelated calf from another cow.

Denise Vouri
Digital Tracker

Beautiful leopard portraits this week. The intensity in the eyes is what photographers strive to capture. Appreciate the camera settings – always good as a teaching/learning tool.

Lucie Easley
Senior Digital Ranger

I am never disappointed in the pictures posted each day. I’m glad to see so many pictures of the little ones as they stay by their moms for protection and nourishment. The black and white of the Tamboti female just jumps out as amazing. She is such a beautiful girl. Thanks for the great shots.

Deana Amendolia
Explorer

Great TWIP Pete! The picture of the Tamboti coming straight at you is awesome. Any updates on the Tsalala’s? We hope to see you when we are back in October. Happy New Year!

Pete Thorpe
Field Guide

Hi Deana! Thanks for the comment. The Tsalala pride is still unstable with some sightings of all three adults together with tailess’ cub, and other sightings of the older tailed lioness roaming around alone or with the one remaining sub-adult Tsalala lioness. This sub-adult does not seem to be associating with the whole unit though, and is mostly seen alone on the odd occasion. I suppose only time will tell what the future holds for the Tsalala Pride!

Judith Guffey
Senior Digital Ranger

I watched her in Dec. 2017. Beautful animal .

Joanne Wadsworth Kelley
Digital Tracker

So enjoy the birthing season and the exceptional images of the little ones. Also it was good to see and hear updates on my very favorite leopard, Mashaba 5:3, who I’ve been following. That was a playful picture of her.

Michael & Terri Klauber
Digital Tracker

Pete, Thanks for a great WIP! We are very excited to see Mashaba’s daughter grow and how exciting to imagine the possibility of her having her first cubs! Fingers crossed!

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