About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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19 Comments

on Collision Course

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Marinda Drake
Member
Guest

Interesting lion dynamics developing.

Blair S
Member
Guest

James won’t the styx male taking over be a bad thing seeing as how they are majingilanes sons and when the sub adult daughters of the majingilanes reach mating age which some of them will soon it will cause Inbreeding?

James T
Member
Guest

Hi Blair,

It’s a good point you make, and inbreeding in lion populations is certainly not unheard of. The genetics are not too badly affected, however, if the inbreeding occurs for only one or two generations. It’s when you get three or four generations or more of inbreeding that the chances of genetic anomalies cropping up increases dramatically. By the time we are a couple of generations down the line, it is likely that the Styx males will be pushed out by new blood. That’s the real beauty of the enormous reserve we are part of; genetic dispersal.

James

Sean
Member
Guest

Awesome! Thanks for the update. I would love to read a post with an update on the Majingilane dynasty. How many known sons do they have, and what are the coalitions named? Where are they? Maybe this would take too much coordination between other reserves…

Anyway, I appreciate the update and look forward to receiving more.

James T
Member
Guest

Hi Sean,

Thanks for your comments and a good suggestion to run a blog on the Majingilane’s history.
A blog like this would not be too difficult to do. As the Majingilane’s time winds to a close it is certainly something that we will probably post. Look out for it in the future…

James

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Great update James, thanks! I hope the Sparta young males stay safe. Where have the Majingilane gone and why would they just abandon the prides and leave their cubs in danger? It should be interesting to watch and see what unfolds next.

James T
Member
Guest

Hi Jill,

The Majingilane have moved into the Western Sector of the Sabi Sands where they currently control the Ximungwe, Otawa and Mhangeni prides.
Yes, doing this does place the young lions of the prides they have abandoned in more danger, but the Sparta young males are now old enough to survive by themselves, and look what’s happened to the Fourways and Styx males; they are set to take over new territory when they haven’t enjoyed the protection of the Majingilane for many years.

James

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Thanks James, I’m happy to hear that the Sparta young males could survive on their own if they had to. Hopefully they will manage to stay safe and regroup. It’s really interesting hearing about the lion dynamics…can’t wait to hear what happens next!

Mike C
Member
Guest

What do you think happens to the 3 sparta young males? Did the separated male re-unite with his brothers?

James T
Member
Guest

Hi Mike,

He hasn’t been seen in a day or two.
There is always the possibility that he has been killed, but most likely the sub-adults have just been scattered, and they will attempt to regroup in the forthcoming days. We will post an update as soon as we know.

James

Mike C
Member
Guest

Thanks James! Coming back to Londolozi in July, cant wait to see what is going to happen with the lion dynamics.

Brian C
Member
Guest

Seems like lots of uncertainty amongst the lions. Good write up! However this ends, it is going to be very interesting. And what is going on with the Styx pride? The two young adult lionesses have split from the pride also and are hanging around the Matimba males. I am really wondering about the future of the Styx, Sparta and Tsalalas.

James T
Member
Guest

Hi Brian,

I’m not too sure about what is happening with the whole Styx pride. We have only been seeing a part of the pride on our side over the last few months. The next few months are going to be very interesting!

James

Bader
Member
Guest

In the north, not only the Matimba males but also the Birmingham males (a young coalition of 4) …I believe they will be the future main threat to the lions in northern and central Sabi Sand.

James T
Member
Guest

That’s a good point Bader,

The Birminghams are definitely a coalition to watch in the future. At the moment they are probably just a bit too young to pose a serious threat, but who knows?

James

Brandon
Member
Guest

Hi James.

With all of this going on what are your thoughts of the 5 Bermingham males that have been seen in the northern parts of the sabi sands coming across. Would they pose a threat to any of the prides and they recently killed a female from another pride in the north. They have apparently moved back into the Manyaleti area. Your thoughts on them will be great.

Sang
Member
Guest

Sweet

Katie Bacon
Member
Guest

We were there last July, when the 4-brothers lion coalition was still in power. What happened? Could you point me to a blog entry that describes the transition?

cameron
Member
Guest

Hi James

What do you think would happen if the majingilane lions and matimba coalition got into a fight?
Who would win

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