About the Author

Sean Cresswell

Safari Guide

Sean is one of the humblest rangers you are likely to meet. Quietly going about his day, enriching the lives of the many guests he takes out into the bush, it is only when he posts a Week in Pictures or writes an ...

View Sean's profile

29 Comments

on The Week in Pictures #170

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Marinda Drake
Member
Guest

Stunning pics Sean. Love the butterfly.

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thought you would like that one, Miranda! Keep well

Sergey Gorshkov
Member
Guest

Thank you, Sean.

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

And to you, Sergey, enjoying your work in the Arctic… Looking forward to seeing the new pictures!

Lynn Rattray
Member
Guest

As always, loving the Nanga female! Thanks for some great shots!

Lynn Rattray
Member
Guest

….and the zebra shot is spectacular!

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thanks, Lynn, what a gorgeous cat! Have you seen the Tamboti young female? In my eyes she is the only leopard to rival Nanga for beauty… It’s a tight match and I’m still undecided.

Kate Collins
Guest contributor

Outstanding Sean! An excellent Week in Pictures, love them all. The zebra are very striking in monochrome. Which one is your personal favourite?

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thank you, Kate. I really love the Nanga close-up, as well as the low-angle of the Short-tailed male; but what makes this one so special to me is that not many people have had an opportunity to photograph him due to his tendency to stay hidden.
This was a rare moment when he exposed himself and posed in full view before reverting back to the cover. After this sighting we realised that he is actually in really good condition, with a clean coat, unscarred face and strong upper body. He may become very well established in the middle of the property!
I also loved processing a monochrome image of a bright bird with many colours; trying to emphasise the details of the various feathers, face and feet being my intention.

Valérie
Member
Guest

A little dream after a week of hard work, it’s very nice! Splendid pictures! Thank you!

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Valérie, what a way to start the weekend! Well deserved.

Ian Hall
Member
Guest

Some lovely photos, the one that would go on my wall is the Nanga female shot.

It highlights the importance of eye contact in wild life photography as much as in human portraiture. Also cracking using of the rule of thirds and excellent use of the wide open aperture. You must have been very close to have that shallow depth of field.

Again that highlights how lucky Londolozi is to have leopard that are so confiding, but luck has to be made and that also shows the rewards of good guiding are animals that are not spooked.

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thank you very much for that, Ian.
I agree with everything you’ve pointed out. The f/2.8 is brilliant in that department, and I always try to make use of this, especially in low light conditions for a faster shutter speed. In post-processing I did make use of a slight sharpening and blurring tool to emphasise that shallow depth of field. That being said, we were very close to her for that shot as she held her line and walked near to the vehicle. She has always been very relaxed with our vehicles which is a privilege.
But as you say, luck is also made, and today we reap the rewards of respectful and ethical guiding and tracking which was pioneered nearly four decades ago. Very good observations.
Glad you enjoyed them, Ian, and looking forward to seeing you again!

Martin Lawrie
Member
Guest

Great photo’s. Keep them coming. Thanks

Rene Lummer
Member
Guest

I have been following Londolozi after recently reading Cathedral of the Wild: An African Journey Home. Now I hope to visit sometime.
The picture that really speaks to me is the little jacana family. The saying, A picture is worth a thousand words, might do it justice. I can imagine older children or adults being ask to write a story about this picture!
This moment in time requires the viewer to slow down and observe to reveal it’s gifts. Gosh I would love a print of this picture!

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Rene, what a wonderful introduction into the Londolozi experience! It is a fascinating book.
I am so glad you have connected with the Jacana photograph as it does reveal so much more when not merely glanced at, as you said. I captured a series of photographs in those few moments when the chicks were separated, but chose the moment when they were being shielded by their father.
If you are interested, please contact me via news@londolozi.co.za
Thank you for your input!

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Stunning images Sean! They’re all so beautiful, but especially the Lilac-Breasted Roller, the Zebra shot and Nanga female. I also love the male Cheetah…I love them all!

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thank you, Jill, haha I’m glad that it’s hard to choose! As you enjoyed the monochrome Zebra and Roller, how do you think the Nanga shot would turn out in a contrasted monochrome?

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Sean, I’m sure your Nanga female image would look fantastic in monochrome! It’s a really beautiful close-up of a stunning leopard….I would love to see it in monochrome.

Kit Boey
Member
Guest

Beautiful pix of the LBR in monochrome, it really shows the bird in its pure beauty without the colours . although the rhino baby is precious as well.

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Yes, Kit, that calf was so special to see, once of the smaller ones I’ve seen! Glad you enjoyed the Roller

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Wonderful pictures! Its the first time I have noticed the feet of the LBR, those long claws are quite something & I guess help catching food. The one of the Nanga is really lovely & shows her spots perfectly. Have a great weekend 🙂

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Thank you, Wendy. I also love the way Nanga’s spots stand out in this close-up. As well as her long whiskers which look so strong and healthy! Am glad the colourless feet and claws of this stunning bird are noticed, they are a crucial part to the Rollers’ success.

Diane Phillips
Member
Guest

I have not thanked you for the wonderful photos you send me each week. Thank you for taking me half way around the globe and making me feel I am inches away from the wildlife I love. It is a treat and a treasure and I thank you.

J.Mitchell
Member
Guest

What FAN-TAS-TIC Pictures.!! I loved them all but the detail of the Zebra outstanding but also the female Nanga & Jacana family. Well done Sean !
Lala

Marianna Gdanis
Member
Guest

Sean, absolutely love this week in pics – very different and makes us long to get back there! Love the Nanga female shot and quite frankly, think you’ve done an awesome job on giving us such a diverse selection to share the beauty of Londolozi

mike
Member
Guest

Is Short Tail male also referred to as Bicycle Crossing?

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Hi Mike. There has been a bit of confusion around this name, but the answer is No.
The Bicycle Crossing male, or Bike, is known as the Tugwaan male on Londolozi. He was born April 2002 and has recently shifted his territory east from southern Londolozi into southern Mala Mala. His mother was the Short-tailed female (with a missing tip to her tail) which resulted in him earning the nickname “Shorty”, after her. So Bicycle Crossing male, Bike, Tugwaan male or Shorty is all the same well-established leopard with a full tail.
The Short-tailed male in this post is a newer, younger leopard which we don’t know too much about. He is not close to half the age of the Tugwaan male, and is literally missing a small, but noticeable, portion to his tail.
He may start showing up a whole lot more as he strengthens…

AJ Reisman
Member
Guest

Sean, this was a joy to read and the photographs are magnificent. The commentary and photos bring back such fond memories. It’s so hard to choose a favorite but if I’d had to say…for the story, the jacana is my favorite. It illustrates that all situations need to be closely reviewed – until you pointed it out, I didn’t realize the chicks were there. And perhaps more noteworthy, it really brings to life the the innate and universal notion of protecting your children as well as the dangers of life on the safari.

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

Sign up for our Newsletters

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile