About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

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10 Comments

on 10 Easy Steps to Understanding Elephant Body Language

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Barbara Lewitt
Member
Guest

On one of our drives, we approached a lone elephant feasting on branches from the rear. He turned around and was annoyed that we surprised him….flapped his ears…threw his trunk into the air and came towards us. Our driver carefully turned the vehicle around and we departed….We got the message !

TED SWINDON
Member
Guest

HI AMY,
THANK YOU FOR A VERY INTERESTING AND WELL WRITTEN ARTICLE.
THE LAST PARAGRAPH, FOR ME, SUMS UP EVERYTHING. NO MATTER WHAT OR WHICH ANIMAL IS BEING VIEWED, TREAT THE SIGHTING WITH RESPECT. WE ARE AFTER ALL IN THEIR SPACE, SO LET US GIVE THEM THE SPACE THEY DESERVE. THANKS AGAIN FOR A VERY INTERESTING READ! KIND REGARDS, TED.

Brian C
Member
Guest

This was a very helpful, honest article. A charging elephant can seem very daunting. Its great to gain a little knowledge about these magnificent animals (and understand a few of the signs the rangers look for).

Ian Hall
Member
Guest

Thanks Amy-great article

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Thank you Amy! I was terrified too then decided to take myself to the Elephant Sanctuary at Hartebeespoort Dam & what a difference it made. I have been into the bush since then & have a totally different feeling now, so much love & respect & fortunately the Guide was very sensible & just coasted to a stop & the ellies just carried on eating. Oh how happy I felt <3

denise Jeffery
Member
Guest

Our most memorable was when we spotted two young adults…one of the ‘boys’ came right up to us with his trunk extended and literally touched us, waving his trunk, smelling us….so I imitated his movements with my arm and touched him…he was relaxed and content that we were not going to harm him and slowly backed away and continued with his pulling a huge bush apart!

Carla Truman
Member
Guest

Amy, such a well written and informative article.
Thank you for sharing !!

Anne
Member
Guest

We had the privilege of running a small photographic safari camp in the Delta. In winter when there was little water and food, the elephants used to come into camp and feed on the trees that we had kept watered. I used to sit under my favourite tree middays and on a few occasions I had elephant feeding right above my head. They were very distinctive as a few in the herd had ‘broken’ ears – hanging onto their faces. My bucket list is now complete!!

Lori
Member
Guest

What are your thoughts on the painting elephants?

Brian Williams
Explorer

On a boat trip on the Zambezi River, we noted a herd of elephants on the shore. I have a picture of two of the elephants with their ears almost pinned back with their trunks tucked in. As the herd departed the shoreline, two of the larger elephants stayed behind and with one leg made circular motions while kind of staring at us. Any significance to those actions?

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