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on Do Male Lions Hunt?

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TERRI CURTIS
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Enjoyed this piece of information as usual

diane sutherland
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great information Mike, will remember those wise words when i hopefully see a pride of lions in the Kruger next week, well written

Arden Zalman
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Thank you, Mike. Can’t wait to see the big guys again.

Tersia Botha
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Thank you Mike. Exceptional information.

Jill Grady
Member
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Thanks for the extremely interesting blog Mike, it was very informative and the pictures are fantastic! I think the Majingilane were my favourite to watch when we were there at Londolozi in Sept. They are so regal and beautiful and easy to see why they are called King of the Beasts.

Chuck
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Great write up!
Thanks!

Rich Laburn
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Fascinating blog Mike, with some really great information. The different stories remind me of a sighting from a few years back where the male got involved in the hunt owing to the size of the buffalo herd. You can see it here: http://blog.londolozi.com/2010/09/buffalo-thrills-and-lion-kills/

James T
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Great post Suthers!

As with most predators, opportunity can play a big part. Watched two of the Majingilane taking down a buffalo bull in the Sand River last year. No females present.

Epic animals, lions!!

James T

Penny Parker
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Really interesting stuff. Great blog Suth!

Francis
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Hi! Totally separate question. When you guys mentioned tsalala pride, is the sub adult female included?

Mike Sutherland
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Hi Francis, yes that is now the case. The Majingilane males have completely accepted her presence now and at the age of 3 years and 2 months, as at May 2014, she is now part of the pride. So the make up in the pride is now, 3 lionesses, 4 cubs.
Mike

mike
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Francis thanks for asking that! And Mike thanks for answering! any chance we may get a pic of her it has been ages since any has been posted! thanks

Wendy Hawkins
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Wonderful blog Mike. I love your picture of the Maji’s, they are a force to be reckoned with 🙂

Damon
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Actually, recent studies on male lions in Kruger national park show that, in wooded areas, they make frequent and sucessful hunters. They get more food from thier own hunting vs scavenging from other lions or even other predators. Studies show that male lion go to denser habitat to hunt, whereas females will hunt wherever they reside. This is likely due to the fact that male lions are slower than lionesses, and also slower than most prey animals they’d like to hunt. The denser cover eliminates the problem his mane would cause him in the open, but then most hunts are done at night. But, in terms of speed, the male lion, reliably clocked, could run 29-35 mph. But, zebra can run consistently at 40 mph. Wildebeast very between 40-50 mph.
Even eland can reach 40 mph. Lions can accelerate faster than their prey, so the closer the male can get, the lesser the prey’s chances of getting away. Lionesses can run 40-45 mph.

Maya
Member
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Nice job Mike. I like it!!!

Ross Wind
Member
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SCIENCE DAILY MARCH 18, 2013 – NBC NEWS MAY 31 2013 (Journal animal behavior)
MOST NATURE DOCUMENTARIES DEPICT MALE AFRICAN LIONS TO LET THE FEMALES DO ALL THE HUNTING – THE BAD RAP OF MALE LIONS COMES FROM A LACK OF DATA – NEW STUDY WITH LATEST TECHNOLOGIES SHOWS MALES LION ARE VERY SUCESSFUL HUNTERS IN BUSSHIER LANDS OF AFRICA.
In our days with so many videos, and pictures of male lions hunting on internet it is almost inexcusable to pretend that males don’t hunt. Yes because of their large sizes and mane in some places it is very hard and impossible. But other places they do just fine. New studies shows male lions are good hunters too. A study said that both male and female lions have the same hunting success rate. Lions success rates are better than tigers.

Brittany
Member
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Great post, I was wondering have you every witnessed a lone male or lone lioness take down a bull or cow before?

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Brittany. Yes in fact I have seen a lone lioness kill a buffalo cow, however this is hugely uncommon and something that is not often attempted by lions due to the risk involved.

creatingkings
Member
Guest

It is so interesting how the masculine(or dominant) and feminine(submissive) energies manifest themselves everywhere in nature. The energies are always relative to the species, the hunting lionesses for example may seem quite masculine by our standards, but even they give way when the hunt requires a little more oomph. A wonderful and educating piece. Thank you!

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