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Ryan James

Contributor

I am the Head of Development at Londolozi's not-for-profit partner organisation, the Good Work Foundation (GWF). GWF focuses on education, in particular helping people living in rural areas to connect to a new, digital Africa and all of its opportunities.

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13 Comments

on A Brief History of the Shangaan People

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Arden Zalman
Member
Guest

Fascinating, interesting, educational and informing. My question is: what was life like for the average woman in days past & how different it is today? After coming to Londolozi twice, & returning this September, I look forward to “just hanging around” with the warm & welcoming people of Londolozi.

Ryan James
Contributor

Great question Arden. The “empowerment of women and children” is a movement that is gaining momentum and a creative space in many developing countries. Access to education is one difference. Not only in formal schooling, but also – at Londolozi itself – we are thrilled to see as many women as men enrolled in our digital literacy and hospitality programs. Last year we embraced the One Billion Rising campaign, and we loved every minute. The campaign spilled over into neighbouring communities: http://blog.londolozi.com/2013/02/one-billion-rising/.

Things aren’t perfect, but there is huge progress being made.

Looking forward to welcoming you on your next visit 🙂

Susan Nethery
Member
Guest

Wow…..that map of tribal history made me understand, finally, why SAfrican politics are SO complicated!!haha!

Judy Guffey
Member
Guest

Very interesting post, Ryan. Love Linah’s smile and I remember her ‘farewell’ hug on my last morning at Londolozi. Eye to eye….we spoke without words.

Ryan James
Contributor

I agree Judy! It’s a “Tutu” smile that carries incredible wisdom and generosity of spirit. I will pass on the message 🙂

Geri Potter
Member
Guest

That’s quite a bit of history to digest in 10 paragraphs! So many tribes, akin to the Native American issues, and foreign settlers involved in the melee. Would love to hear more!
Thank you for the beginning of the education, in this, as well as so much else that is S. Africa!

Ryan James
Contributor

Hi Geri, thanks so much. Linah is so good at explaining African history and politics and I will definitely be spending more time with her. If you missed it, here is a blog post on “Linah the Storyteller” – http://blog.londolozi.com/2013/02/linah-the-storyteller/.

Ntombi Nxumalo
Member
Guest

I am impressed by the story of Shangaan people (as i am a Shangaan from Bushbuckridge). Our history as Shangaan people is complicated and most South Africans are not aware of such.

I hope to visit oneday to the Londolozi and try to connect better with my ancestors by listening to Lina.

Nduma Ndlovu
Member
Guest

Interesting hey. Thanks for the article.
I always wondered whether tsonga’s and shangaans are one and same tribe.
But I just figured it out from this article.
And as a matter of interest I have one question Ryan, May you please brief me about the history of tsongas who already settled in SA before king soshangana.

Beta Samuel
Member
Guest

Thank you for the informative article. We have read a
lot about the descendants of Soshangane.
What were the other noticeable names in the Shangaan history?

Ishmael Bongani
Member
Guest

I’m a Shangana myself,but I always had mixed understanding about my history and it hurts me when other groups are making fun of us.Thank you for breaking it up for me so I can understand how we really came about.I will pass the link to this site to everyone I know so the get to understand who we really are.

freedom khoza[ludlow]
Member
Guest

a very interesting history of us the shangaan tribe indeed.

Mikayla Klauber
Explorer

Ryan,
I had the pleasure of meeting Linah and watching her wonderful drumming and dancing when I was a guest at Londolozi in 2012 and 2014. I am doing a project about indigenous peoples and my parents, Michael and Terri Klauber, are involved with the All Heart Fund. My mom actually became a member of the tribe, and was given the name, “Tsakani Happyness.” I was wondering if you could ask Linah if she could give me some information about any human rights struggles she knows about that concern/concerned the Shangaan peoples? This could be things like people not respecting their land, their rights, being ridiculed by non-Shangaan peoples, etc.
Thanks so much! I know this is a lot to ask but if you could get back to me as soon as possible, I would greatly appreciate it! You can also reach me at my email: mikaylaklauber@newgate.edu
Thanks, Mikayla Klauber

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