Tragedy? | Londolozi Blog

About the Author

James Tyrrell

Alumni

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

View James's profile

148 Comments

on Tragedy?

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Leslie Backus
Member
Guest

I think that Mother Nature may need a hand in this case. Cheetahs are struggling to survive and you may be able to save 3 by saving 1, along with their future offspring. Londolozi has a tough decision to make.

Adam Bannister
Member
Guest

Dart her and save her and the cubs!

Niamh
Member
Guest

Oh God – this is so hard!! While one side of me is shouting – DO SOMETHING – the other side is saying, let nature take its course!! This has to be one of the hardest parts of your job, looking on knowing that you could do something but are unable to do so!! As we all know though, Nature does have a way of surprising us from time to time & maybe, just maybe, she might surprise us all & come through this!! All we can do is hope & pray xx

Charles Wemyss-Dunn
Member
Guest

Normally non-intervention makes sense and is absolutely the right way to go, but given the critically endangered status of cheetahs this case in my opinion is different. I have witnessed low key intervention in the Masai Mara and it does seem to have its merits in certain cases. I think in this isolated case I would intervene so as not to lose three cheetahs, the most fragile and rare of African cats.

Lynn Rattray
Member
Guest

So very sad.

John Wilson
Member
Guest

Hi James, I say dart the three get her back to good health and release them, maybe I am to soft but hate to see animals of witch there are so few left lost when we are able to help. Nature is to harsh some times. Please keep us up to date. Hope it all turns out well.

Elaine Randolph
Member
Guest

Purists seldom win. Pick her & the cubs up & move them back to their own territory. A stich & antibiotic dhot may save 3 cheetah and future generations. This is for their sake and ours. Figure out ehy she’s moving outside her range. Save her. You will only regret not having done so.

Mary Hubbard
Member
Guest

What everyone else said….. Save her! Please keep us posted! Good luck!

Holly Cheese
Member
Guest

I say do what ever you can – there are not enough cheetahs left to ignore this. Also having spent time with this mother and two, I have a very soft spot for them!

maxine gaines
Member
Guest

We impact on these animals in ways we can’t even imagine by constantly viewing them. I think we owe it to them to help if we can. I think that you should call the vet and get her stitched up. We have done it before. I vividly remember sitting on the londolozi airstrip all night watching over a mother cheetah and her two cubs after she was stitched up by Douw Grobler from Skukuza. We had to watch her all night to make sure she was protected while coming round from the anesthetic and to chase any other predators away while she recovered. There was very little impact on her. Her cubs ran of a short distance when we darted her but stayed nearby and joined her again while she was coming round from the anesthetic. You just have to hope the stitches hold when she chases her next impala!

Deb Mills
Member
Guest

There are too few cheetahs in the world…intervention is the right thing in this case

Margaret Hide
Member
Guest

Save her!

Rowena Lafferty
Member
Guest

I’m with the interventionists, too. Dart and treat her. If she’s mobile afterwards, try to provide kills till she heals. She is a draw for your business.

emma daniels
Member
Guest

please please dart her and the babies, the cheetah are protected anyway and are struggling as it is, this family need your help now more than ever

Diane Miller
Member
Guest

absolutely save them ! feed them and get a vet to dart her and give her antibiotics and assess wound, you can and must save them !!!!!

Choruban Taran
Member
Guest

I agree with most of the people on here. There are very few cheetahs in the wild. If you can help save these 3 cheetahs than please do what ever you can to save her. Best of luck!

C
Member
Guest

Save her…..I find the Non-intervention policy ridiculously stupid and on top of that…she has cubs and everyone knows how hard it is for cubs to survive into adulthood.

James T
Member
Guest

Hi “C”,

Thank you for your comments. I would be interested to know why you find the non-intervention policy ridiculously stupid, as you put it..

James T

Alyse Smith
Member
Guest

I agree with all above. Depending on what her injuries actually are, perhaps a relatively simple intervention could possibly save all 3. In this case, saving these three is the right thing to do.

Syl
Member
Guest

As said above….cheetahs are struggling to survive….I’d step in & help.

Connie Gildner
Member
Guest

I agree with Elaine Randolph Dart them move them back to their home turf stitch her up give her some antibiotics and see what happens

Makesha Clark
Member
Guest

Intervention must take place. Cheetahs are rare, beautiful, and spectacular, and I always look forward to hearing about them. It would just be heartbreaking to watch them all suffer. Please take cause in this action. In the end, everyone will agree this will be the best outcome for now and in the future. Please save Mother cheetah and her babies.

Diane Faria
Member
Guest

I do realize that we should let nature take it’s course bit i also feel that with the Cheetah being an endangered species, intervention would be an acceptable solution. Isn’t Londolozi situated close to Moholoholo Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre?

Peaches Stefan
Member
Guest

Please do the human thing and save them.

MICHAEL MADONNA
Member
Guest

SIMPLE CALL – CHEETAHS = TOURIST DOLLARS AND PHOTO OPPS = SAVE THEM AT ALL COSTS. Mike Madonna

Mary Beth Wheeler
Member
Guest

So many salient comments. In brief, I agree with Adam – dart her and save the three of them!

marlies mcdonald
Member
Guest

I have to agree with the above comments: there are way too few cheetahs in this world, make an exception this time, try and save the three!!!!

anthony goldman
Member
Guest

I agree with most of the sentiment here it would be tragedy to loose these 3 cheetah`s ,especially since we are in a position to help her and not effect anything else,as a physician i would have an even harder time not saving them .Do the right thing Londolozi!!

Rudolf
Member
Guest

Please help that cats! 🙁

brian evetitt
Member
Guest

Please dart her and save her and the cubs please we can’t afford to lose them please help

Mou
Member
Guest

We claim that we don’t want to intervene. But we always do !!! But only in a negative way – hunting so many species to extinction and/or almost extinction, destroying their natural habitat are just a couple of factors to name a few, as a contribution of mankind on the other species…The moment we are arranging safaris, putting up lodges, we are intervening. So why can’t we do that in a positive way? At least sometimes when we know it is no harm but instead may be a lifeline milestone to such an endangered species? Why we have no intervention ethics only when it comes to help them? I wonder….. I guess only conservation is just not enough now.. It is time to do something to repair the damage we have done already.. Intervening in such exceptional cases can be just the beginning of it. I guess it is time to introduce a policy where we can help positively to save these animals and not intervene only in the form of euthanizing them to save them from pain. Giving a chance to live can be very important too and certainly without affecting nature in a negative way. I guess the park authorities are the best one to decide on a case to case basis if a policy like that is introduced.

Jaime
Member
Guest

I think she needs to be treated. There are far too FEW Cheetahs and any help we can give them is a win win.

Dr Cathy Todd
Member
Guest

Help her! dart her and the cubs and keep them safe until she is healed. Cheetahs are rare and their numbers are falling.

Petra Pesman
Member
Guest

I would ask you to make an exception in this case. Cheetahs are having a hard time in this world due to various causes. By intervening you would not only save 1 cheetah, but 3!! A lot of cheetahs are being killed by the hands of humanity, so now you could do something in return. Please save her and her cubs.

Helle & Max
Member
Guest

Please – in this very special case – HELP her. Not many of these fantastic cheetahs left – would be such a loss to loose 3.

Helle & Max
Member
Guest

Please HELP her – so few left of these amazing cats.

Arden Zalman
Member
Guest

Saw these magnificent creatures in March & have been following them on the blogs. YES!!! Please save them. They are too important for the world to lose them. I pray to Mother Nature to send her blessings to all.

Ronnie Morris
Member
Guest

I have to agree with everyone else. Seems to be a no brainer! Remember a female leopard some years back with 2 cubs and a bad case of mange? the decision to intervene was right then and it is now. She went on to live almost 17 years and was arguably the most successful and famous leopard at Londolozi. You might know her as 3:4 female, we knew her as Manana, the Leopard Queen! Do the right thing again guys!

Cyndi Stone
Member
Guest

The normal decision of non-interference does not take precedence over the opportunity to save an endangered species. Since the cubs are not able to survive without her, taking a step to ensure the mom’s survival are absolutely warranted.

Millie Farris
Member
Guest

Intervene, please.

Manfred H. Braig
Member
Guest

Hello Londolozi, we stayed with you, and saw Cheetahs during our visit, ( Howard Buffet was next to us taking pictures, and Maxime was our female Ranger, and of course we met Natasha ) since we are Cheetah Fans and they are endangered, I say please, please call the VET in Hoedspruit to come to the Lodge and look after the Cheetah… I urge you to do it, please call the VET in Hoedspruit NOW…. thank you for taking care of our beloved Cheetah, Manfred H. Braig in Florida

maxine gaines
Member
Guest

Hi Manfred. This is Maxine. So good yo hear that you are still following the events and lives of the animals at Londolozi. Hope you are well. I agree with you wholeheartedly and I am sure that Londolozi will make the right decision. They have intervened with Cheetah before as you will have seen if you read my comments above. In fact they intervened on another occasion with cheetahs and with Howard Buffett’s (who was a frequent guest) help saved two cubs whose mother had been killed. One of those cubs was successfully released again. The other was unfortunately not well enough to be released but was used in a breeding programme at De Wildt. Take care of yourself Manfred. So nice to hear ftom you again.

Larry Ferrere
Member
Guest

I say, in this case, screw the non-intervention policy — same the female cheetah (and it saves her two cubs too).

Ginny
Member
Guest

Save her and her cubs! Cheetahs need all the help they can get these days!! Not for your tourist dollars or photographs but because they are endangered and critically so. Please keep us updated.

Patty Kelly-Skirvin
Member
Guest

I understand the hands off approch, and would normally say let nature take its course, BUT you are dealing with the lives of 3 endangered animals here and I, personally, would help in this case, to be able to give the cubs a fair chance at life.

Zoe
Member
Guest

As my absolute favourite wild animal, I too am in support of doing whatever is necessary to save this beautiful mum and her cubs. Their lives and ours will be enriched by an intervention. What are the cons of helping her? Knowing that you changed the course of nature? So what, you saved three lives!!!? I think the guilt of not helping her should that result in a tragedy will far outweigh the joy of knowing you saved her. The guilt would last a lifetime. Help her!!!!

CH Young
Member
Guest

A difficult decision — damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

But as heartbreaking as it is, and as much as I want to see both the mother and cubs survive for a variety of reasons (the fact that cheetahs are so few in number being the least of them), I don’t think Londolozi or anyone else should interfere *unless* the injury can be attributed directly to people, whether purposely or inadvertantly. If it’s an act of nature (attack from another animal, fall off a cliff, etc.), then nature should be allowed to take its course no matter how difficult it is to watch from the sidelines.

I’m kicking myself for saying that, and feel absolutely gutted about the situation because I *do* want to see them all survive; but I feel strongly that it’s not our place to interfere in these situations unless we’ve caused it.

maxine gaines
Member
Guest

In response to your comment, think on this for a moment… as guides taking guests out on game drives at Londolozi or any one of these private reserves we do our utmost to be sensitive to the animals and not interfere with their lives. But no matter how sensitive and ethical we try to be (and believe me I know I was a guide at Londoz for ten years) there are times when we mess up. When we don’t switch off the landy soon enough when the cheetah is stalking and so alert her prey to her presence. When our presence at her successfull kill draws the attention of a vulture or hyaena or lion and results in her losing her kill that she would have otherwise kept. How can we not interfere and help her when it is a reality that we negatively impact on her life at times even if we try our hardest not to? She deserves our help. It is time to pay her back for our mistakes and for the joy she had given to do many by allowing us to witness her secret life.

James T
Member
Guest

There are two sides to the argument, neither necessarily right or wrong, but I do tend to side with Maxine here. Whether it is a case of a guide ‘messing up’ or not, our presence in the area is impacting the animals by default. If we were to insist on having no impact at all, we would have to leave entirely. No land-rovers, no lodge, nothing.

James

Juan Jose Rubio Coque
Member
Guest

Cheetah are in critical danger. The intervention is justified

Thom Murawski
Member
Guest

Totally understand the dilemma, but given the circumstances and the opportunity to save not one, but three such precious creatures, the decision seems all but obvious to me. I am hopeful that with the wealth of wisdom and experience that abounds at Londolozi, there is a responsible way to intervene.

Mike Sutherland
Member
Guest

This is an extremely tough position for the Londolozi team to find ourselves in. It goes against our moral code of non-intervention and letting Mother Nature take her course and in this respect one would argue against helping them. However, in the same regard, Cheetahs are an endangered species in the world and their population is faced with sure extinction somewhere in the near future, and for this reason I would argue to save her and her cubs! A sad time, a tough decision but the right one will certainly be made by the Londolozi team!

Katy Magill
Member
Guest

While I fully understand the importance of non-intervention under “normal” circumstances, I would advocate for intervention in this case for the same reason I would if there was an injured rhino: these animals are so rare and endangered that we should help them if we are in any position to do so! Especially where the life of her babies depends on this decision as well. Good luck!

Karen Kendall
Member
Guest

It would be cruel and inhumane of you not to provide appropriate medical treatment to this mother and safeguard her cubs , you have already jeopardized her outcome for treatment in this ridiculous delay for treatment , your thinking is so old school there is no place for it in todays world . Wildlife has provided you with wealth , start giving it back .

James T
Member
Guest

Thanks for your comments Kendall,

There is certainly a case to be made for intervention in this matter, but I would be hesitant to jump in with accusations of ‘ridiculous delay’ and ‘no place for such thinking in today’s world’.
Letting nature take it’s course is in most cases an easy decision to reach, but in this kind of situation obviously the stakes are different given the species, the area and the number of cheetah it may possibly affect.
One of the reasons for a non-intervention policy is that we have no way of knowing what repercussions will result from our actions down the line.
Say we intervene and save this mother cheetah and her cubs. A few years down the line, maybe the young male cheetah will grow up to hold territory here himself. Maybe one day he will be making his way past a boulder-field where a mother leopard is denning her cubs, smell them out and kill them. Our actions today could result in something like that tomorrow. An extreme example I know, but certainly one to take into consideration. Would we then step in to chase of the cheetah before it attacked the leopard cubs?
Where do we draw the line?…

James T

Clarice
Member
Guest

Save them, please. They are so rare already. Help them!!!

leo
Member
Guest

but how can that cubs save by lions or leopards or hyenas

Juliana
Member
Guest

I was at londolozi this morning and we saw the female and the cubs eating a impala, she and cubs eat all the impala! They look fine…

Cornelia
Member
Guest

I have to agree with helping her ..

k
Member
Guest

Please help her and her cubs. Cheetahs are becoming few and far between. They need all the help they can get!!

Amy
Member
Guest

Another vote for intervening!! Please do what you can to help her and her cubs. As one person said, a it might be a fairly quick fix in the scheme of things and will help insure the survival of the species. I know there are others around but the numbers are low. Please help!

Trish Heywood
Member
Guest

Hi Londolozi
With all the bad elements our wildlife is having to endure from humans, surely it would not be amiss to treat this brave mommy and offer her better chances of surviving?
Please help her.
I am lucky enough to have been able to visit Londolozi in the past and I would like to see your loving, caring attitude helping your wildlife too.
Best wishes
Trish Heywood

Martha D.
Member
Guest

Please do make an exception and try to save her. We can all see how usually the no intervention policy is appropriate, but there are times when intelligent considered exceptions should be made. And certainly this is such a case….for all the reasons already noted.

William Dixon
Member
Guest

Intervene. Put them in an enclosure. treat the wound then rerelease them. Give them a chance to survive

Sheena
Member
Guest

James – have you now managed to asses the level of the injury?

patti mccabe
Member
Guest

Pleae save them the cubs are too young ..we know that nature takes its course with the wild but why …if nature wanted her to die without help then they never would have been found ,,nature wanted you to find her and help ..the distress they are going thru ..please don’t let this happen … god put us in charge of his precious animals ..don’t disrespect..don’t stand by..HELP

Irene Nathanson
Member
Guest

Please save them..exceptions to rules can be made. Give them another chance!
Have there ever been any other circumstances where you would ave been permitted to intervene?

Kelley
Member
Guest

Save them! ASAP. They are too precious and scarce.

Kelley
Member
Guest

My husband Bill agrees SAVE her.

Diane
Member
Guest

Given the fact that there are so few of these cats alive in the wild today, every one is worth saving. To lose all three, when intervention and possibly some stitches and antibiotics are what she needs to save her life and the lives of her cubs, would be a crime, in my opinion. I think that it is worth darting her with a vet present to see what can be done if she is not able to hunt for more than one day longer. Or if she is incapacitated to the point where she cannot even defend herself if a lion or leopard comes across her. How do you know that her injury is not the result of a run in with a snare or some other man made object?

Geri Potter
Member
Guest

Living in coastal Massachusetts, there is a large population of seals. They attract Great Whites in the summer. Recently, a baby seal was found by a diver, injured badly by a great white. The baby cuddled up to him and he brought it to shore and called the Massachusetts Aquarium, animal rescue. They arrived, assessed the situation, reprimanded the diver for intervening and left the seal pup on the beach. Cruel? Yes, to us. But it is the circle of life…for whatever reason that pup wasn’t strong enough, smart enough or the mother wasn’t.
Same with the cheetah. They aren’t pets. If they were, well of course we would intervene. It’s TOUGH in the wild, but IF we want to save it, first we protect the TERRITORY and get rid of the POACHERS…let nature do it’s thing.
And just MAYBE these two will survive together. Nature has it’s way.

Dan Harlacher
Member
Guest

The future of these amazing animals is in peril. Rarely do we humans have a chance to have a profound impact in saving not one but three special creatures. Lets do all we can to make a difference in extending life for these cats. Every day they live is a day that more people can embrace and undestand just how precious they are and how thankful we should be to honor them. Do all you can to save life team Londo! Thank you

AF
Member
Guest

Clearly with the diminishing number of Cheetahs, they need to be saved! Especially because I need to see them when I am back in South Africa!!

Adele Harlacher
Member
Guest

Why is this even an issue. Sometimes in our life we have to interfere with nature and do the right thing. The right thing here is to save these beautiful cats. We had the privilege to view the mom and babies in May this year. What a magnificent sighting. They need our help so please please help these helpless cheetahs!!!!

Cornelia
Member
Guest

Please help them..

Doron
Member
Guest

Please intervene and save them

Brian C
Member
Guest

Obviously, people should not affect the outcome of interactions between wild animals. Trying not to interfere with nature is a great policy for a wildlife reserve— most of the time.
But you should allow yourself some exceptions to this rule (on case by case basis). Cheetahs are vulnerable to extinction per CITES/IUCN. Helping this mother and her cubs seems like the right thing to do.

Good Luck and Best Wishes for the mother Cheetah and all those at Londolozi wrestling with this decision.

Brian

allan cassel
Member
Guest

PLEASE INTERVENE AND SAVE THEM.

THIS IS THE EXACT SCENARIO THAT HAPPENED WHEN I VIDEOED THOSE LIONS WHO HAD LOST THEIR PARENTS AT AN EARLY AGE AND COULD NOT FEND FOR THEMSELVES.

THEY WERE SO HUNGRY (LOOK AT THEIR SKINNY BODIES)THAT THEY HAD TO ENCROACH ON ANOTHER PRIDES KILL AND IN DOING SO I WITNESSED 2 OF THOSE 5 SIBLINGS BEING KILLED.

I POSTED THAT VIDEO A FEW DAYS AGO .

SINCE THERE ARE SO FEW CHEETAH LEFT THEY MUST BE SAVED.

ALLAN.

Paul
Member
Guest

Please SAVE them!!!!!!!!!!!!

Billie
Member
Guest

P L E A S E H E L P T H E M

Sean
Member
Guest

I am not entirely sure if the policy of “no intervention” is sound. In principal I agree that in a perfectly balanced wilderness one should let nature take its course. Land in the Greater Kruger Park is managed in various ways by burning, mowing, maintaining artificial dams/waterholes, maintaining roads and fence-lines. With all this land management which surely has an impact on animal numbers/movement I think it is feasible to intervene in some instances (human caused or not). In my humble opinion I would not see a major problem darting the mother Cheetah, giving the wound a good clean, possibly trying to fix any major damage, giving her a dose of long lasting antibiotics and sending her on her way. But having said that I also respect the decision to not get involved.

Kira
Member
Guest

SAVE HER and let the cubs live!

Beatriz
Member
Guest

I believe the right thing to do is save the Cheetah’s ! Just like John Varty interfered many years ago with a mother leopard & her cub. Especially now that Cheetah’s & lions are declining in numbers. Londolozi has grown & benefited from wildlife through tourism, save the Cheetah’s please!

Rich smith
Member
Guest

The logic of let nature take its course is no longer an option for cheetahs, and countless other species. The days of old school thinking of letting nature take its course are long gone. Survival of the fittest does not apply here either. All these old thoughts are just that, old purist logic. That logic needs to change. It’s sad we are living in these times and we have to change our thinking on treating wild animals.
There are many places where cheetah are always helped in these very same cases for the very same reason, they are disappearing. If one mother dies with cubs, obviously they all die. If she lives and the cubs survive, more chances for the future. There are many, many success stories in treating cheetahs. Some of these saved cheetahs went on to live very productive lives, as well as their offspring. In the Mara the vet is called as soon as something like this happens, it is a high priority. I can’t imagine how few (if any at all) cheetahs would be left in the Mara without these seemingly drastic measures. Whether injured by man or nature, it does not matter anymore.
This is not a case of we love this cat so please save it. It is for the species itself.
The future of big cats is dismal enough and it’s our fault. If we can save one animal for the greater good of a species, I feel it’s our duty. We owe it to them!

George
Member
Guest

It isn’t even a question you have to ask. Endangered cats like these are so valuable every single one. You must intervene! Place them all in the briefest possible captivity and fix the Mom’s leg & then release them.

Marleen
Member
Guest

Dear people from Londolozi. An animal that crosses your path becomes also your responsibility simply by having become part of its life. Your tourists have a great time viewing her and her cubs, think about this as repayment.
If there is any chance the injury will heal by itself then let her be and just maybe put some meat out to sustain her throughout the healing process.
If a quick in the field operation is needed by a vet , please organise this asap so she won’t lose too much of her strength in the meantime.
The non interference policy is a bit outdated and certainly frowned upon by most of the tourists that come to SA, as this is not the way in most of the rest of the world. If and when it concerns an animal like cheetahs who don’t have it very easy and numbers are dwindling this is more than ever a cause to take on if one of them needs your help.
Take a look at what for instance the DSWT and KWS do for Kenyan animals and use this as a good example of what is the right thing to do.
Best
Marleen

Kerry
Member
Guest

Non intervention policies suck, especially as custodians of this planet which I might add we suck at as well, we have choices – Here a choice could be made to save these animals not stand by and watch her die in pain and then lo and behold we’ll watch the cub’s starve to death as well. Where is the justice? Mother nature as you say can be cruel at times but arn’t we above that. You say it will be sad to watch so what do you get out of the suffering of these animals, maybe you are stronger than me. All it takes is a bit of intervention sometimes.

Merle
Member
Guest

There is so much tradgedy happening to our wildlife all man made. Make an exception as decent human beings and save this previous species.

Jane Dunmall
Member
Guest

Cheetahs are so endangered by other factors that no cheetah particularly one with cubs should be allowed to suffer and die. Please save her and by doing so hopefully her cubs will survive too.

STEVEN
Member
Guest

The non intervention policy is hogwash,man intervenes all the time in the natural world. That is why there are so few cheetahs and other predators. Poaching is intervening and causing numerous deaths. How about when a cheetah or other predator starts killing native’s livestock? Isn’t that animal usually killed with no regard for potential effect on young cubs that are dependent on the now dead animal. Dart the female treat her and release her they have an amazing will to survive their injuries.

Shelley Alkema
Member
Guest

Why don’t you ask her? Simple… see if she wants us to help.
I am utterly impressed at the astonishing wounds I see many animals cope with and recover from because they have developed their own way to heal and deal with injuries far greater than we know how, and this includes the “big” revenue making animals as well as the small more insignificant to the masses ones that carry on suffering because we turn a blind eye. Shouldn’t they all be treated with the same respect despite their status in our human eyes?
Coming from a veterinary background I thought I believed in our natural instincts to help and care and nurture however when it comes to wildlife – animals who don’t have any human contact other than accepting the presence of someone on foot at a distance and the smell of us in large noisy vehicles – then it is terribly distressing to them to go through an anaesthesia and find their bodies have been tampered with whilst recovering from a drugged state and feeling incredibly vulnerable.
It is our place to intervene at times but we must remember we cannot play God. This cheetah must decide to live and this will or will not happen not matter what we do.
Firstly I think we need to assess exactly how serious this wound is. If she is able to walk and hunt then no, we most certainly should not fix her up. If however after a few days she is not making any progress or deteriorating then yes, I think that a veterinarian should be called in to take a “look” at what would be involved to help her and what the consequences would be if we were to intervene.
This is not a decision that should be taken lightly but a very important one that must be made either way for the better good of THIS individual and not just the species as a whole.
Most definitely I want to see her and her cubs survive but we must not take this decision out of her hands. We need to stay detached from her and look at the bigger picture, just as we do for any other animal in need.
Good luck and peace be with this beautiful individual.

James T
Member
Guest

Thank you very much to all who took the time to write in with your concerns and opinions.

We at Londolozi are very happy to report that after closer investigation the injury to the cheetah does not seem as dire as we initially imagined. Although nasty looking, the injury seems more superficial than anything else and the female was able to hunt, catch and kill a young impala yesterday.

All three cheetahs seem healthy (apart from the wound), and our observations of the female indicate that she is not favouring her healthy back leg as much as we would have thought. She is walking with very little trace of a limp and the outlook is extremely positive at the moment.

We will of course continue to monitor the situation closely but at this stage no intervention seems necessary and it looks as if the female is well on the road to recovery!

The Londolozi Team

Syl
Member
Guest

Thank you for the update James.

Alan
Member
Guest

so hectic!!!!

Gavin
Member
Guest

Save the Cheetahs!

Marcell
Member
Guest

There is so much tradgedy happening to our wildlife.

Gavin
Member
Guest

JT…

I DO agree with the no intervention policy, as in the greater scheme it ensure the survival of the fittest. I am aware that some areas, have the philosophy of only interfering if the the animal is a highly endangered animal (wild dog, cheetah, roan, Black Rhino etc)… In which case this cheetah would be “helped”, but then how would you do it and what would happen to the cubs while the animal was darted to be healed? Or would you just feed it while it healed naturally? In which case it would start to associate vehicles or people with food and we all know how detrimental that could be….

What are your expert personal opinions on this policy?

Gavin
Member
Guest

Just seen you update that the animal is improving and the wound is healing naturally…

Would still be interested to hear what you think hypothetically should be done in a similar situation with a wound that could be fatal?

Paul
Member
Guest

Let nature take its course, unless of course the injury was caused by a human..fix her up and let her get back into the wild

Gregg
Member
Guest

Save the Cheetahs Please!!!

Jacqui Hemphill
Member
Guest

Great news that the wound is healing slowly, what a relief… Awesome write up JT!

Jenifer Westphal
Member
Guest

For many reasons – some I would admit would be more selfish on my part – I would have voted to save the cheetahs. It’s nice to here the cheetah mother is doing better. I’m in awe of the passionate community we all call Londolozi. Thanks for the updates James!

Olga
Member
Guest

We unfortunately have not seen cheetah at Londolozi on either of our visits, so reading this gives us hope that our next visit will be more fruitful with regard to cheetah viewing.

A very difficult situation to be witnessing as one should let nature take it’s course, but there is so much more to this as the future of all cheetah hang perilously in the balance. Had it been another species that isn’t endangered, I would certainly let nature take it’s course. Considering however that cheetah are an endangered species and there are 3 lives at serious risk in this current situation, I would choose to intervene and potentially save all 3 animals.

I wish you all the best in deciding your course of action and certainly hope that this family of 3 will survive.

Susan Bailey
Member
Guest

Please help them. They are too rare to be left to die.

Wodaj
Member
Guest

Great that the cheetah is recovering on her own! As the majority of suggestions (>95%) is in favor of helping an animal, I hope Sabi Sands have got the message clearly. Many of us still rue the death of Styx male lion regardless of global outcry for intervention. The interference of mankind in wildlife has already threatened the existence of these precious animals. Wildlife has given us so much and it is only logical in every sense to help them before they disappear from the face of the earth.

Carol Robinson
Member
Guest

Thank goodness! I had such a wonderful sighting in June and would be so sad to lose them. They are such magnificent creatures.

colo43
Member
Guest

Please help if at all possible. Nature is cruel at times and we, as care takers need to help when its needed. Obviously in this case it may be needed ..
Thank you.

Sandy
Member
Guest

Please save her and her cubs. I think you were meant to find her. Some rues are made to be broken.

Karin MacLarty
Member
Guest

It would be enormously sad to lose three cheetahs James. They are without doubt my favourite cats and very special to Londoz. And these three have brought all of you and your guests such pleasure. I am a mother so every fibre screams save them but I am very aware of your non intervention policy. I hope she survives.

saye225
Member
Guest

Save the Cheetahs! This is the three lives,Please help them!

Cynthia Thurlow
Member
Guest

We had the opportunity to see the female cheetah and cubs during our visit in April…I recognize that there has to be a balance and let “nature take its course”, but these animals are truly rare…please look out for her cubs, as someone who has had the incredible opportunity to see them in their natural environment, I would hate to know that the cubs would not survive if she passes away :(((

Bennett told me that it had been 15 years since he had last seen so many cheetahs…

Walter Nussbaumer
Member
Guest

While I realize the policy of “let nature take it’s course” is normal, in this instance I would spare nothing to assist this mother. We are dealing with an endangered species and it needs all the help we can provide. Please help before it’s too late.

Betti Zucker
Member
Guest

Intervene to watch one cheetah die of natural causes is natural evaluation. To watch three die is a disaster

Adri Pretorius
Member
Guest

That is wonderful news that the Cheetah female is not that seriously injured!!!
The two young ones have to start hunting by themselves, and “look after mum” for a change!! 😉
Should it be necessary, please intervene and help her. There are so few of them left!!!
The world does not have a lot of sentiment towards animals, therefore, thank you for what you are doing to give them a save haven.
Kind regards out Namibia.

Ciera Davis
Member
Guest

Reading this is really breaking my heart. We set out to find the male cheetah back in June and instead stumbled upon the mother and cubs. It was right at the end of our stay and the three of them are truly incredible. I understand the no intervention rule completely, it’s necessary to keeping the balance and letting nature take it’s course but these animals along with so many in the bush are not at the numbers they should be. Even still, taking a chance on the mother is one thing, watching the healthy cubs die if she doesn’t make it would really be a mistake I think. But then again I understand your guys’ dilemma.

MJ
Member
Guest

While it is human nature to intervene and help.. We must let nature do what she does best, take care of herself.. If the female dies, what do you want them to do, put the young in a rescue where they will never learn to hunt and be free? I agree with the hands off approach, as much as it pains my heart to do so.
Maybe mum will rally and they will be fine.. Only time will tell.

Evette Hartig
Member
Guest

Please help save her, to let her and her cubs die would be a tragedy if there is something you can do to help, you must.

Jacques Proust
Member
Guest

Humans have created false habitats and areas, we have intervened so much already, you must intervene again in this situation……..no doubt!

Karla
Member
Guest

Please save these animals! Exceptions to rules exist everywhere. This situation seems to warrant intervention.

Pam
Member
Guest

Sometimes intervention is needed especially as human encroach on land

Judy
Member
Guest

PLEASE help the cheetahs! I was a guest at Londolozi in 2007. That was the one cat I really wanted to see, and there were none in the area. It would be such a shame to lose them now that they are there, especially as you would be losing the cubs as well. Thank you for considering.

Bev
Member
Guest

Since there are so few cheetahs in the wild, human intervention in this case should be considered.
Having just come back from the Kruger Park and been lucky enough to see a cheetah and her 2 young cubs, 3 of only about 120 cheetahs in the park, the more we save the better.

Gretchen
Member
Guest

it’s such a difficult question to answer. My intellectual brain rationalizes the need to allow nature to take it’s course. Yet with that said, what does that truly mean? Is human intervention one form of the natural selective process? It could be? My heart pleads to save them…..

Scott Smith
Member
Guest

Save.

Suzanne Myers
Member
Guest

OH PLEASE!! Intervene!!!! Help this mother and the 2 cubs!! I KNOW this is the wild BUT even tho it is,the only reason they die is because there is no help!!!! IF this wound is fixable, doesn’t it make since to save her???? There are so many animals becoming extinct!!! PLEASE !!! There are 3 here,, NOT 1… Thank-you for hearing us!!! PRAYERS WE ARE HEARD!!

jan-erik
Member
Guest

I agree with most comments, but my question is WHAT can you do?
1. Need to stitch the mother’s wounds (which means taking her down with tranquilliser and what happens to the young in the mean time? )
2. Do you take her into a clinic for treatment? Again what do you do with the young?
3. Capture the three of them to be released later? And where? I understand that you do have exchange programs with other reserves? And will they still be surviving in the wild after that?
4. let nature take care of the issue?
Mind to let us know what options you would have?
Thanks for caring so much.
JE

KIMIAND
Member
Guest

干预

jowett
Member
Guest

why not, we must save these nice animal

Malcolm Holland
Member
Guest

No one has yet been able to define “nature’s course” to me.
Maybe ‘natures course’ in this instance was to guide her to your assistance.
She is not some wild creature totally unknown to you.
You have given her a name and have introduced her to your guests over a significant period of time.
She is part of you and, as such, is entitled to your special attention.
HELP HER!

Mrs Hema Desai
Member
Guest

Please help her in any possible. The animals are loosing out to lions and humans too. Very few left in wild and in such case human intervention is needed. Not one one the souls will be lost.Thank you

Donalea Patman
Member
Guest

Intervention is what is required as wildlife across the world is threatened. Understand that you want nature to govern existence but in essence, humans have interferred already with disasterous results. Don’t watch this family perish for the sake of your rules – we owe our animal kingdom all the help it can get.

Jorina de Kock
Member
Guest

This is my favorite animal. Please please help her !!!!!!!!

Vicki
Member
Guest

My personal opinion in this case is to help the mother if you can and the cubs if you can’t. Cheetahs are to endangered not to step in if you have to. From the wound I saw she should recover well…….but a shot of antibiotics ( from a dart gun even would help). I believe in the hands off policy except in cases like your area where cheetahs are a rare treat to observe. If the mother does pass I would not trap and remove the cubs but have a tracker follow them and watch what happens when they have to hunt on their own. At this point they are not experience hunters but have a good understanding . I would think a tracker with a silencer on a rife would be able to provide some assistance to the cubs if needed. This during a hunt try are doing and only if it appears they are not going to get a kill. There are ways to help them that keep them in the wild with minimal interference.

Doreen Dziepak
Member
Guest

intervene and lend support in any (all) ways possible – especially for an endangered species ! this seems an exceptional situation (cheetahs once again in Londolozi) and should be an exception to the “rule”
if I recall correctly, Londolozi is the “protector of all living things” – take this seriously . . .

Saul
Member
Guest

Ah man. She’s a nimble one with cubs. People have helped before, vets and rangers. What’s the issue now?

Marion Morris
Member
Guest

The world is not the way it once was nor is their habitat. So in this case, letting nature take its course would be so incredibly unfair to them. Please help them. There is truly no valid reason to stand by and watch them perish. Thank you for reaching out for opinions and your proactive efforts to protect wildlife.

Kc
Member
Guest

Please save them. You have the ability in these circumstances to do the right thing and help save a species.

Carolyn Roth
Member
Guest

If the mother dies, save the two young ones by sending them to a zoo.

Mike
Member
Guest

help fast!

John Holley
Member
Guest

James great news to hear the female is doing so well now!

Thanks for your thought provoking write up!

Maria Pascullo
Member
Guest

Vi prego, intervenite per favore prima possibile per salvare la mamma ghepardo ed anche i suoi cuccioli!!
Il ghepardo e’ un animale meraviglioso e gia’ a rischio estinzione, non lasciate morire la speranza che questi bellissimi e fragili animali possano contribuire alla sopravvivenza della loro specie!
Please, aiutateli con ogni mezzo, vi supplico con il mio cuore pieno di dolore per questi indifesi animali. Grazie per tutto quello che farete per loro.
Maria

LC
Member
Guest

Please save her… I saw her in person early July, one of the most magnificant cheetah ever- extremely photogenic! and the cubs are so cute… .

ALISON
Member
Guest

SAVE HER PLEASE, CHEETAH IS ALREADY SO PRECIOUS NOW!!!!!!! SAVE ONE MOTHER MEANS SAVE HER CHILDREN ALSO!!!!!

TinaGreeff
Member
Guest

Let us hope the mother heals quickly to ensure the survival of the beautiful cubs

狮300斤
Member
Guest

Please HELP them

Milo
Member
Guest

Please save them!! these cubs needs their mother

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile