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James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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44 Comments

on Lion Warfare: Majingilane vs New Males

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Daniel
Member
Guest

Very interesting article. Thank you.
But, my question is: Why didn’t the Majingis kill the intruder like they did with one of the Selatis or with Kinky Tail? Was the intruder too strong or didn’t they have enough time?

James T
Member
Guest

I think in this case they realized he was beaten and no further threat to them. They lay around him for a long time, and only when it seemed like he would try to make a break for it did they become aggressive again. Possibly they realized that the combination of stress and injuries would weaken him further throughout the day and he would be far easier to finish off towards nightfall; it was only the timely intervention by the elephants that saved him.

Jason
Member
Guest

Daniel the reason is that the majin’s didn’t see him as a threat and he is a subadult so they didn’t attack to kill just giving him a warning. In saying that he is a very lucky subadult male lion to get away with he’s life,he has two older brothers or cousins that he belongs to they are nomadic lions they weren’t with him at the time because they new the main’s were around.Ps nomadic lions avoid territory males until they become fully grown males them-selfs and seek a pride of lioness and then become territory males. I hope this info helps answer your question.
Reguards Jason

Rich Laburn
Head of Digital

Amazing sighting James. I am incredibly envious that you witnessed such a spectacular showdown!! Great shots from you and Lucien as well!! rich

Mary L Turgeon
Member
Guest

Amazing pics

Wodaj
Member
Guest

Thanks a lot James! The intruder is one VERY lucky lion. Not many lions get away once 3 Majingilane have a full grip. The Majings involved look like Scarenose and Goldman. who was the 3rd Majing?

James T
Member
Guest

Hip-Scar was the 3rd one involved. The missing male was Dark Mane who was found just west of camp that morning.

Wodaj
Member
Guest

Thanks a lot James. That is what I expected

Anne Wiles
Member
Guest

AMAZING sighting but what chance does the injured lion have of surviving that attack? Thank you for sharing.

James T
Member
Guest

Anne it remains to be seen. We weren’t able to get an accurate idea of how badly he was injured unfortunately. John Varty stayed with the lions all morning until the elephants came and scared them away, and he said at one point the injured male was really struggling to move around or even stand up. However, when he got his opportunity to escape, he took it and fled at full speed.
Reports form Sabi Sabi to our South are that the injured male reunited with his two coalition-mates that evening, so we will have to see if they are brave enough to stick around on the borders of the Majingilane’s territory.
As far as we know, the Southern or Selati Pride at the moment have only one dominant male in charge, so they are ripe for a conquest. Biggest pride in the Sabi Sands with almost 20 members… a perfect target for three new males…

Peter
Member
Guest

As ususal, a great write up. Amazing this nomad got away, with the elephants certainly playing an important role. But without any doubts: this nomadic male saved his life by himself to a large degree. He fought back bravely as per pics and report. Showing not being an easy target. Very often this makes the superior opponents thinking twice to risk a serious injury, especially if there is nothing left to prove. The Majingilanes are a formidable force. Glad the nomad go away!
He was seen the next day with the other 2 nomads further south, walking fine … good news, his spine is fine, hips and legs not injured as well. Nasty wounds though, hence I think there is a very good chance for a full recovery.

Patrik D.H.
Member
Guest

Hi James, thanks a lot for keeping us informed on the events of last week, and the information given. What would be your estimation of age of the injured lion as you mention stress could be the reason for the undeveloped mane of older males ? Also, have you or your colleague-rangers been able to catch some daylight-pics of the other 2 fleeing lions ? Many people wondering which lions these may be. Thanks again for sharing and best regards

Bader
Member
Guest

Thanks James! I have the same question here as Patrik…Is he a sub-adult or an old lion?…and any estimate of age for the other two? …Thanks

Murtaza
Member
Guest

Great questions! Age and also what coalition can these three nomads be a part of – in other words, what pride and which lion coalition might they be children of?

Tammy Perger
Member
Guest

Wow what an amazing sighting to have encountered….so so envious!!

just wondering about the injured male…you had mentioned spinal injuries…is this something that we will eventually hinder his exsitence??

again thank you for sharing these incredible sightings.

Dan
Member
Guest

Great sighting!

Todd
Member
Guest

Was the short maned lion an old stressed lion, or just young?
Thanks for an awesome write up.

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

Am so glad that you managed to take photos though i think it would have been better had you managed to capture it on film.The mapogos were captured so much on film during their happy times when they were the dominant coalition and during their difficult times when Kinky was killed by the Majingilane & Satan by the selati,but there has been less filming or none on Majingilanis & Selatis!Is it lack of interest on these coalitions compared to the Mapogos?Away from that story this male that was being attacked which is younger i believe should have gotten away from the majingis cause i believe he should have much more speed than these older lions lucky for him the Elephants gave him a lifeline,that’s why sometimes i believe lions are not intelligent & just die young out of ignorance.

Adam Bannister
Member
Guest

Tim we have HUGE amounts of footage of these Majingilane Males. It just takes longer to edit film (post production) then it does photograph. Have a look at this link

Majingilane: The Story of Lion Warfare
Documentary
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n5Pbe2w_IE

I think you will now understand! These Majingilane have a MASSIVE following

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

Thanks Adam for your information.Now “Majingilane:The story of lion warfare” is a film which i have already watched a long time back.That is the reason i was saying we do not have any films on the majingis and selatis like we had on the Mapogos of which were countless that i can not remember how many films i have watched of the mapogos because i can say they were several.I understand when you say editing takes some time but i have only watched one film of the majingilanes which is The story of Lion Warfare,it would have been different if you told me there are couple of films on them apart from warfare.This gives one the feeling that the mapogos were the favorite coalition of lions and that was why they were filmed occasionally time and again and that these other coalitions are not as interesting to the majority of wildlife researchers.

Patrik D.H.
Member
Guest

Tim,
One explanation is that the Mapogos were in charge during 6 years, the Majingilanes now 2 years. Moreover, Mapogos were in the spotlight due to the live drives of Wildearth. But you can find a good number of short (or also some longer) video clips on youtube by typing the word Majingilane.

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

Thanks Patrik.I will try and view the video clips of the majingis on you tube by typing the word Majingilane.I enjoy watching these footage especially the longer clips.At least you have explained partly why their videos don’t seem many,I had overlooked the fact the mapogos had reined for a longer period of time and the Majingis are only starting out.Thanks alot.

Nicole Nisbet
Member
Guest

Unbelievable photographs! What a sighting!

simone mets
Member
Guest

We saw the male with the undeveloped mane and his brother hiding out from the “four brothers.” I guess it was just a matter of time. The pictures are incredible. I would be curious to know if the injured lion survives too. Your proximity to the fight is amazing!

Bob Cooper
Member
Guest

Great write up and awesome sighting. Thanks

Jody Morrison
Member
Guest

WOW! Thanks for your amazing pics and great write up. I am sure glad that I am not a male lion.

Arden Zalman
Member
Guest

Wish I was there!

Jeff Lampkin
Member
Guest

Looks like they made it down to Sabi Sabi where we were recently! http://www.sabisabi.com/blog/1816/new-kidz-on-the-block/#more-1816

John O'Brien
Member
Guest

Hi James! Ahh, brings back memories from the battle our group and you witnessed last November. I can still hear the growls of the fighting males. Hope you’re doing well along with everyone else.

James T
Member
Guest

Hi John, good to hear from you!
That was indeed an amazing spectacle, I remember it well!

When are you coming back for another visit?
James

Courtney McGuigan
Member
Guest

Hey John! How are you all? I’m booked for a return in January. Maybe we should get the band back together? Please say hello to everyone for me!

And James, I’m putting in a request now for lion warfare sightings during my stay. I’m sure you guys can make it happen! 😉 Getting so excited! Those puncture wounds look so deep and painful. It’s a wonder he could walk let alone run away. Poor guy.

Robert John Vang
Member
Guest

For now, there will be no stopping the Majingilane Coalition! Long live the Kings!

Raviraj pawar
Member
Guest

Very fierce encounter hopefully the wounds on the young male don’t get infected and he can make a full recovery.

danielle
Member
Guest

Makes the itch to return even greater. Amazing pics. Being that close in an open aired jeep must have been incredible.

MJ Bradley
Member
Guest

Wow, that isn’t something you witness very often! the power and the violence of these warriors is amazing.. Thank you for sharing..

Shirley
Member
Guest

Wow, how amazing, I hope the Majingilane Coalition will hold on for a time, so the cubs will be safe. Thank you very much for this spectacle pictures and writing.

Marion
Member
Guest

Thanks to everyone involved for a great blog. Living in Cape Town these blogs are my link to the bush and with big stories like this I always like to read the comments to see what happens after the fact. Thanks to Peter for the update, I’m pleased to here he is walking fine and hope to hear news of the injuries healing well soon! What a fight!

Steve
Member
Guest

Great pics/blog there.Love following these Coalitions,such amazing animals.Hate to see one guy caught by 3 or 4 thou,it just ain’t a fair fight.That’s nature eh! Delighted he took the opportunity to get out of there when he could,lucky fella.I’d say these guys (the majingilanes) have a few years reign in them yet,as they were young enough when they ousted the mapogo, probably in their prime now.Be amazing to get a first hand view of it all out there one day! Keep the reports comin’.

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