21 Comments

on The Week in Pictures # 46

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Anna
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once again Talley another fabulous blog post of what’s going on out there. Not sure how i’d have felt with that python, but very interesting! can’t wait for next week!

Arden Zalman
Member
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Thanks Talley, for a wonderful week in Londolozi even though we are in Sebastopol, California, your pictures bring us back to a magical time. Looking forward to next year.

Syl
Member
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Talley..what a great week in pictures. You’ve spoiled us rotten:)
Thanks ever so much.

Scott Luedke
Member
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Talley
Thanks for sharing your incredible pictures each week. After months of waiting, it’s only a couple of weeks and I’ll be able to experience Londolozi. Would you recommend bringing a 300mm lens or would a 70-200mm be sufficient?

Terry
Member
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Thanks once again Talley for the beautiful pictures and well written blog. Those female leopards are beauties!

MJ
Member
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Once again a wonderfully descriptive blog on a week in Londolozi.. My hearts desire is to visit your wonderful country one day in the not to distant future.

Sheena
Member
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Wonderful …..

Geri Potter
Member
Guest

Love to see the Tsalala cubs; they are two of the four we saw last June when they were just tiny. Sad they are the only survivors, but so HAPPY they’ve made it so far!!! 🙂 They will ALWAYS be my favorites!
Thanks for ALL the great pictures and updates, Talley. It’s ALMOST as good as being there!;)

Zach Hershman
Member
Guest

As always, I love the pictures and am grateful you share them with us.

Jess
Member
Guest

what a cool week – some rare sightings – love the caterpillars

Rich Laburn
Head of Digital

Great post Talley, Vomba is stunning as always!!

Janet
Member
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Thanks for sharing your lovely photo’s!

Howard Kelly
Member
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Hi Talley,

Great photos. Just from an interest point of view could you tell me what time the crocodile was seen eating and possibly what the ambient temperature was at the time. Would be useful info for some research I am doing.

Thanks

Howard Kelly

Jane West
Member
Guest

Tall! Love the shot of the giraffe and impala. Frame-able! Guess which picture I didn’t like!!!

Shirley
Member
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Wonderful picture. I love it. Thank you.

Sheila
Member
Guest

So many wonderful photos. Thank you very, very much.

Elsa
Member
Guest

I have a question about the female colored nyala bull. We see these sometimes at Tembe on cam however in the past they have been identified as “redbull” nyala and are described as females with horns. I would like to get clarification on this, whether it is a female with horns or a male with female color. Thank you.

Grant
Member
Guest

Elsa, on a private game reserve that I used to work on, we lost one of these Male/Female morph Nyalas during a reloacation. The vet, being naturally very curious decided to use the opportunity to learn something. What we discovered with that particular animal was that it was in fact a male, his genitals also being very under developed. Both males and females when they’re young have female colours, the change in colour comes about when testosterone levels rise when the males begin to mature. In this case, the release of testosterone must be insufficient. If anyone has anything else I would be interested to hear.

barry zettergreen
Member
Guest

hello my africam friend ELSA asked me to pass on this info to you
in tembe elephant park we have see 2 redbuls – what appear to be female colored
nyala with horns – i do have 2 cam pics of the animals –
http://www.flickr.com/photos/47893944@N00/7518447758/sizes/m/in/photostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/47893944@N00/7518446678/sizes/m/in/photostream/
hold cursor over – WILDLIFE – THEN PLAINS GAME selcect any of the animals
and look for – trophy – in all sites i have found all female antelope have been recorded
with horns– EXCEPT the bush buck

Trophy

Only adult bulls have well developed horns. These are lyre-shaped with two full spirals, are smooth and have distinctive white tips 6-8 cm long. Horn buds appear after six months and reach a length of 20 cm at 15 months. The first spiral is complete at two years and Rowland Ward minimum trophy quality is reached after five years.

Occasionally ewes are found with rudimentary, malformed horns. These ewes are referred to as red bulls as they grow significantly larger than normal ewes. A red bull with a mass of 114 kg and a trophy of 32.5” or 83 cm was once recorded in the Imfolozi Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal.
http://www.wildliferanching.com/content/nyala-tragelaphus-angasii

TED SWINDON
Member
Guest

HI TALLEY, ONCE AGAIN YOU HAVE SHARED WITH US YOUR MAGNIFICENT PICTURES, THANK YOU! WHAT A GREAT WEEK YOU HAVE HAD.
YOU HAVE SOME REALLY NICE PICTURES OF THE VOMBA FEMALE AND THE RAVENSCOURT YOUNG MALE, TWO LEOPARDS THAT I STILL HOPE TO SEE.
THANKS AGAIN FOR THE UPDATE TALLEY.
KIND REGARDS, TED.

Lisa
Member
Guest

The pictures this week are amazing… again! I absolutely adore the picture of the hippo. They are my favorite animal and definitely my favorite part of Safari with Rex and Life last year. Can’t wait to make it back someday!

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