15 Comments

on Leopard Dynamics: The Opposing Strategies of the Maxabene Young Male Leopards

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Adam Bannister
Member
Guest

Very well written James. In my opinion your interpretation is spot on. At least a far as I have seen thus far. I too do not think that a young leopard “does not know how to mate”. These animals are born with some much inherent instinctual behaviour that they surely know how to act! I just wander whether Camp Pan is possibly showing signs of age and the young male knows that if he can hang in a little longer then when the big showdown happens he will be ready…and he will know his piece of turf batter than any other leopard in the area!

Patrik D.H.
Member
Guest

Hello James,
I’m not that familiar with leopards, but it’s a highly fascinating story ! I hope you will give us some updates in time so that we will know about the outcome. Thanks for this report!

James Crookes
Guest contributor

It’s a pleasure Patrik. I will definitely do a follow up article as soon as there is an update. Hopefully you will keep following our blog to see how the story unfolds.

Margarita Doychinova
Member
Guest

What a beauty!!! Thank You!!!

Erwin B
Member
Guest

This is very interesting. How large are the Maxabene brother leopards compared to the territorial males in Londolozi?

James Crookes
Guest contributor

Erwin, it would be difficult to say weight wise, but my feeling is that there is not much of a difference now. The Camp Pan male is an enormous leopard, so he is still a fair bit larger than the Maxabene males, although there have been a couple of instances where we have had to look twice in differentiating the 3:2 male from Camp Pan. The Maxabene males are still filling out a bit, but already their tracks are as big, if not larger, than some of the other territorial males.

Judes
Member
Guest

Fascinating reading, waiting with anticipation for the next update , and enjoying the sheer beauty of the pics – Tamboti female gorgeous!

James Crookes
Guest contributor

Thanks for your comment Judes. The Tamboti female is surely one of the most photogenic leopards around, I absolutely love photographing her.

Alessio
Member
Guest

If so, Maxabene at begin of 2013 start to be not only one of the strongest male in sabisand but one of smartest

Rudi
Member
Guest

Just an Update, The 3:3 young male has now ventured very far West, and for the past 2 days has been seen on Alicecot, in the Western Sector.

James Crookes
Guest contributor

Thanks for the update Rudi. It will be interesting to see where he settles.

TED SWINDON
Member
Guest

Hi James, awesome shots! Well done!
This is what brings me back to Londolozi time after time.
Kind regards,
Ted.

James Crookes
Guest contributor

Thanks Ted, it was a first for me and such an interesting interaction. This is what makes each day at Londolozi so exciting!

Courtney McGuigan
Member
Guest

I have no idea of course if your theory is correct, but if so, how incredible! It’s mind blowing to think of these gorgeous creatures with such advanced and complex longterm strategic planning capabilities. Wow. Fantastic. Thank you for the photos and for the education!

Linda
Member
Guest

The 3:3 male is now down Southern Sabi Sands after a few fights with the males in the West. He is mating as well. Fascinating to watch these two boys go about establishing their territories as Tu Tones has stayed in the same place and Makhotini is now wandering far and wide looking for new territory. Interesting too that their older brother, the older Maxabeni 3:3 has settled in the east. Please keep us updated. A great story to be told.

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