About the Author

Tom Imrie

Field Guide

Tom is the voice of wisdom, reason and logic on the Londolozi Ranging Team, as well as all the other facets that go hand-in-hand with being an intellectual far beyond the realm of most mere mortals. There are very few subjects under the ...

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7 Comments

on Why We Believe That Thomas Jefferson Would Have Loved Londolozi

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Marinda Drake
Member
Guest

Interesting blog Tom. There is definitely a change in weather patterns this year. Last winter was not cold at all. Maybe not a drought quite yet, but after a few very wet years the climate is changing. Let’s hope for a very cold winter this year.

Kate Collins
Guest contributor

Thank you Tom. I throughly enjoyed your post and like you, I believe that Thomas Jefferson would have fallen in love with Londolozi!

Sue Sylvester
Member
Guest

I have been told that the weaver birds build high if there is to be a wet summer (rivers flooding) and low if there is to be a drought. My Zulu gardener is probably right! He also said the Glossy Starling is called ‘Star of the Morning’ in Zulu because it is the first to call in the early dawn and wakes the farmers up to work in the fields.

Steve Gordon
Member
Guest

I enjoyed reading your informative blog Tom. As usual you provide some interesting insights and raise some compelling questions. Your abstract of Jefferson’s work shows that despite the complexities of the natural world, much can be learned and predicted with the combination of meticulous observation and an inquiring mind. No digital camera needed!

Sean Cresswell
Member
Guest

Absolutely love this post. Makes for a great read and really raises some important observations over the past few months. Thank you, Tom, for sharing… As always!

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Thank you Tom for the very interesting blog and reminder that we can all do our part in helping to heal the damage that has been done to the Earth. In Canada, seeing the Robins arrive back from their winter migration, has always been our first sign that spring has arrived, but in the past two winters I have been stunned to look outside and see the odd Robin still with us through the winter. This is a bird who eats worms and insects and was eating the birdseed, peanuts and suet that I was putting outside in feeders during the winter for our year round birds, such as Cardinals and Blue Jays. So, we are also seeing birds skipping their migration, as well as more rainfall and flooding in our summer and colder, more severe weather during the past two winters. It’s interesting to hear from different parts of the world as to the changes in climate and animal behaviour that have been noted.

Annette Gordon
Member
Guest

You prove that philosophy is for us all. We loved your spin on the world. Thought provoking. To read this now, just like on game drives. Lucky us! Turned into miliant recyclers.
So want to return.
Tom, you represent the best, of a lot of bests, of Londolozi.

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