About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills were well developed, and he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team as a result. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the photographic skills ...

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12 Comments

on Where have the Hyenas Gone?

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Arden Zalman
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The circle of Nature in the Bush

Trevor & Colleen Patrick
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Hi James is that densite down south (just past Wilkinson) still inhabited? With this heat I’d stay underground! Greetings to all.

Cipriano
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4 fully grown male lions is a force to reckon with. If I were a hyena I would keep my distance.

Geri Potter
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This is a sad consequence of a stable lion environment. One of the BEST afternoon drives we shared with John Holley and Richard Siwela was when we visited an active Hyena den. The interaction between the youngsters and the adults was amazing. The FUN was seeing the littlest ones come ever closer to the vehicle, at first shy and then increasingly curios until they were chewing tires and food baskets. the MOST adorable things and too much maligned. I hope they come back, at least to chew your shoes!! 🙂

MJ
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Thanks you for the update on the hyena. I find them one of the most interesting mammals in the bush.

Wodaj
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Interesting twist in predator dynamics! Congratulations to Majingilane! Few years back, hyenas tripped off the tails of Tsalala lionesses and snatched kills so often. I am pleased to hear Hyenas are pushed out.

Kk
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Fascinating. I wonder in areas where lion hunts are allowed and male lions are taken out regularly, if hyenas mulitply tremendously and become stronger than the lion prides themselves?

James Weis
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Hi James,

Such an interesting article… It never ceases to amaze how the ebb and flow of nature changes what we experience in the same place over time.

Water can often be the cause of such change – either via direct rainfall like that experienced in the Sabi Sand or by annual floods in places like the Okavango Delta, where a river that had been dry for years suddenly flows again and changes the lives of the animals that live there.

Competition between predators obviously also can cause changes in their immediate environment depending on the breeding success of one or the other. Your observation regarding leopards changing their habits at Londolozi certainly proves that some animals will adjust very quickly to changes in their surrondings.

Great reading and thanks!
James

James
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Hi James,

Thanks for your comments, good to hear from you!

It will certainly be interesting to see what happens as the dy season approaches once more…

Regards

James

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