About the Author

James Souchon

Field Guide

James started his guiding career at the world-renowned Phinda Game Reserve, spending four years learning about and showing guests the wonder of the incredibly rich biodiversity that the Maputaland area of South Africa has to offer. Having always wanted to guide in the ...

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28 Comments

on Why You Should Never Say No to Exploring

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

James he is beautiful. Is his mither the White Dam female as he is named White Dam. He will be Camp Pan’s grandson. We love to drive out and see what the bush give us. Sometimes we do not see much and sometimes fantastic sightings. The best is to be out in nature, no matter which road you took.

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Marinda, Yes is Mother is known as the White Dam female. I agree with you as well about it doesn’t matter which road you take as long as you are exploring!

Ian Hall
Master Tracker

“Don’t you love it when a plan comes together?”

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Ian, it really does make your day!

Joan Schmiidt
Master Tracker

James, what a wonderful blog! I saved the leopard the Leopard in the tree, the Leopard going down the tree, and Leopard on the in the grass🤗

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Joan, we were very spoilt that morning for sure.

Andrew and Daniel Bolnick
Digital Tracker

Good call James. It’s only partially about luck. Never underestimate skill. Nice photos

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Andrew and Daniel, thanks so much!

Dina Petridis
Senior Digital Ranger

Hi James , I just put some foto’s on instagram of our magical safari together !

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Dina, I will definitely go and have a look!

Darlene Knott
Digital Tracker

‘Go with the gut instinct’ is normally a wise adage! It worked out that day for sure. I love the pic of his leap down to the termite mound! Thanks for sharing!

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Darlene, glad you enjoyed it!

Annie.Lane07
Explorer

Intuitive ‘knowing’ and what a beautiful sighting it has produced. Leopards are elusive and solitary, and how privileged we are to see this handsome leopard relaxed and happy in his natural habitat. Thank you Londolozi.

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Annie, it really is a privilege!

Victoria Auchincloss
Digital Tracker

fabulous pictures!!! you reinforce my feelings when getting into the car in the morning and you are asked what do you want to find. my answer is always let’s go and see what you can find. there is always a great surprise thanks to your expert knowledge. Victoria

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Victoria, I do love that feeling of anticipation at the start of a game drive!

Wendy Macnicol
Digital Tracker

You know, James, I cannot tell you how many times we have looked for leopards in trees with NO success whatsoeve over many years in the Bush! At Londolozi – just judging from the number of Leopards we have seen in pictures – you seem to grow trees with resident Leopards in them all over the place! (Perhaps I am exaggerating a little bit!) Wendy M

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Wendy, it does seem that way a lot of the time. It is certainly quite a sight to see and hopefully you get a chance next time!

Bob and Lucie Fjeldstad
Guest contributor

Hunch = Gut instinct= Premonition = Experience = Knowledge etc etc etc. It all comes down to just another reason Londolozi’s ranger/tracker teams are THE BEST!!!

James Souchon
Field Guide

Thanks Bob and Lucie! We are very lucky to have a lot of experience in our ranger/tracker teams. Some of them have been here for over 30 years!

Suzanne Gibson
Guest contributor

Great sighting, James. I was thrilled to see this male’s presumed father is the Makhotini male, who I saw as an adolescent cub with his mother the Maxabeni female and sibling (who I believe was later named Tu-Tones?) Guess he’d be about 11 years old now. Do you ever get reports on him from neighbouring reserves? – I’d heard he’d moved off Londolozi but stayed fairly close, but that was a long time ago.

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Suzanne, yes you are absolutely right. The Tu-Tones Male and the Makhotini Male were brothers and the Tu-tones Male dispersed to the east of our reserve where he unfortunately succumbed to injuries in a fight with baboons quite a few years back. The Makhotine Male held onto territory for quite some time in the southern most parts of the reserve before being pushed even further south and out of our traversing area. As far as I know he is still around which is very impressive for a male leopard because that would make him 12 years old. Hope you are well!

Paul Canales
Senior Digital Ranger

Brilliant! As always, thank you for sharing the process along with the results!!

James Souchon
Field Guide

Thanks Paul!

Joanne Lofthouse
Digital Tracker

Hi James, thanks so much for sharing this experience with me. My dream is to come to Africa and see all these magnificent animals first hand, but with all that is going on right now, who knows when travel will be allowed again. But until that time, I enjoy all the pictures and stories from all of you. Thanks for bringing Africa to me.

James Souchon
Field Guide

Hi Joanne, its an absolute pleasure and I also hope the world returns to normal again soon and we can share these sightings first hand with everyone again!

Denise Vouri
Guest contributor

Hi James, just caught up with your blog/video this morning. I’m a total believer in gut instinct coupled with experience and what I found from my first visit to Londolozi is that each drive yielded something special, from Ingrid Dam female posturing in a tree to a beautiful gray heron with a freshly caught fish in his mouth… go out, explore and nature will deliver her gifts.

James Souchon
Field Guide

So true Denise, thanks for sharing!

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