About the Author

Paul Danckwerts

Ranger

Zambian-born, Paul grew up a fisherman, a birder and a lover of all things outdoors. Following his passion for wildlife he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Rhodes University before heading for the lowveld. Paul boasts a number of years guiding ...

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22 Comments

on Is Seeing the African Wild Dog Tantamount to a Safari Gold Medal?

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Wonderful blog about wild dogs Paul. They are my favourite predators, maybe because they are so endangered. We are fairly regularly in the bush and see them maybe if we are lucky only once or twice a year.

Thank you Marinda

Joanne Wadsworth Kelley
Digital Tracker

The image of the pack of four sizzles with the intensity of the hunt. Coupled with their coloring, they certainly portray the darker side. Happy to hear that they live in Londolozi and hope their numbers will somehow increase.

Thank you Joanne. I was fortunate to get an image i was happy with in amongst the chaos.

Amanda Ritchie
Marketing Manager

Great post, thanks Paul. Really enjoyed the mix of storytelling and factual information.

Thank you Amanda

Bridie Tane
Guest contributor

Vividly remember one drive when Sandros heard of a pack in the north and turned to us and said hang on!! We caught up with them just after a kill , a large pack an amazing experience

Thank heavens the days of van der Post and others who killed so many beautiful creatures, are over. Alas, the endangered are not nearly out of the woods yet. Live on Lycaon pictus!!

Ian Hall
Senior Digital Ranger

I was very lucky to see a hunt from start to grisly finish. Been lucky to see packs in Botswana and Tanzania. Sounds a very special sighting.

Ian Hall
Senior Digital Ranger

I should have added the hunt was at Londolozi and the driving by Simon that day was stunningly good.

Ian Hall
Senior Digital Ranger

Ah, but the gold medal goes to a Pangolin or a Caracal

Very true Ian. If and when i have enough images of a pangolin i’ll certainly write about it. Thank you for your comments.

Denise Vouri
Digital Tracker

Totally fascinating informative blog. I have to admit the thrill of their hunting prowess is exhilarating, even knowing what the aftermath might be. I’ve been fortunate to see these amazing killing machines in action in both Sabi Sand and Tau Pan with the former pack of nine successful whilst the latter pack of 6 gave up the impala chase , walking away, tails between legs!

I find their coloration to be beautiful and it lends to their camouflage within the bush. I look forward to more encounters watching this incredible predator.

Thank you Denise. I’m glad you enjoyed reading it.

Wendy Hawkins
Senior Digital Ranger

Yes the thrill of watching them hunt is amazing! That lope as they seem to be sauntering on a casual stroll, then get going after prey & finishing it without many scraps, is awesome & their colours always intrigue me – I just love them. Thank you Paul they would be my medal 🙂

Thank you Wendy 🙂

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

My first ever sighting of wild dogs was a pack of about 30 at 6 in the morning on our first morning in Moremi on the 2nd January this year, and I will never forget it!

Victoria Auchincloss
Digital Ranger

The wild dogs are fascinating to watch.it is always great to see them. In December 2016, we found ourselves in the middle of a stampede of Impalas chased be wild dogs. It was something. We were with Greg and Equalizer. Victoria

Michael & Terri Klauber
Digital Tracker

Paul, We enjoyed reading your blog and appreciated your detailed writing style! Must have been thrilling to see two packs in one sighting. It’s also sad to hear that they are continuing to decline in their numbers!

Thank you Michael and Terri!

Allen Reich
Explorer

Enjoyed this report from the bushveld; it is good to read that wild dogs persist (tenuously, it appears) despite a collection of forces – including human attitudes – more formidable than those antagonistic to the health of other larger predator populations.

But having lived (to the extent that they allowed me!) with these magnificent animals for over three years in KNP and surrounding reserves in the mid-late 70s, I do have to take issue with the reference to a ‘dark side’. There is no dark side to Lycaon. Absolutely none at all. But a world without them would be a dark world indeed. Hope they will brighten my days when I return to South Africa next year!

Well said Allen. Thank you for commenting.

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