Involved Leopards

Maliliwane 2:2 Female

Maliliwane 2:2 Female

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Gowrie 2:2 Male

Gowrie 2:2 Male

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Ximpalapala 4:4 Female

Ximpalapala 4:4 Female

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Ximungwe 5:3 Female

Ximungwe 5:3 Female

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About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

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14 Comments

on Why the North is So Dangerous For Leopards

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Lynne
Member
Guest

Thank you for such an interesting story! Although I have never visited Londolozi I feel I have been there after reading all the wonderful blogs done by yourselves !

Lorenz Korder
Member
Guest

Hi Amy, so interesting to see how certain areas of the reserve have challenged leopard life. I am curious, could you explain to me or point me to a reference that explains the number ratio at the end of leopard names?

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Lorenz. These numbers refer to the spots above the upper line of whiskers on a leopard’s face (we look first at the right side of the leopards face before moving to the left side). Each leopard has a differing number or shape to these spots meaning you can successfully identify individuals. Although there are a number of different techniques used, we find this the easiest and most widely used. Hope that helps!

Lea
Member
Guest

A good article Amy and thanks for trying to unravel the leopard dynamics. As they say, the circle of life, out of something sad comes something good and, new characters take over a territory. Some things in nature will never be understood by humans, but that is what makes it so interesting and adds to the mystery.

Hyo-Jung Kim
Member
Guest

Thank you so much for this wonderful reflection piece. I always enjoyed reading this blog which I regularly visit so that I can keep abreast of the going-ones at Londolozi.

Chris
Member
Guest

Hi Amy. Do you know the sex of the Nanga female’s cub?

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Chris. Yes, it’s a female.

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

How old was the Tutlwa Male?!Was he not a mature male leopard but young?!If so how possible was it for the Gowrie Male to kill an adult male leopard,not unless he was carrying an injury on him?!

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Tim. No he was about a year and a half old. So although he was just reaching independence he was still relatively small compared to the much older male leopard. So it was therefore very likely that the older male killed him. Thanks , Amy

Monique Steyn
Member
Guest

Hi Amy
Thank you for an interesting read and clearing up who the body of the young leopard was in the tree with 8the Gowrie male. Do you have any idea or speculation as to what happened to the Nanga Young Male?

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Monique. No I’m sorry we don’t. He was seen for about three months after independence and then just disappeared. He was never reported becoming independent in any of the neighbouring areas either and so was assumed dead.

Lorenz Korder
Member
Guest

Thanks Amy, that is fascinating, would have never guessed it has to do with spots!

TED SWINDON
Member
Guest

HI AMY, I HOPE THAT YOU ARE WELL.
CONGRATULATIONS ON THIS EXCELLENT BLOG, SO WELL WRITTEN AND INSIGHTFUL.
YES, IT IS A DIFFICULT SUBJECT TO WRITE ON, BUT YOU HAVE MADE SOME VERY GOOD POINTS.
AS YOU KNOW I AM PASSIONATE ABOUT THE LEOPARDS OF LONDOLOZI AND FOLLOW THEM VERY CLOSELY, SO YES IT IS VERY SAD WHEN ONE DIES OR IS KILLED.
I AGREE WITH YOU THAT THE FUTURE DYNAMICS OF THE NORTH ARE VERY PROMISING FOR NANGA AND THE MASHABA YOUNG FEMALE.
I WILL CONTINUE TO FOLLOW THE DYNASTY OF THE LEOPARDS OF LONDOLOZI.
IT IS SUCH A PRIVELEGE TO BE PART OF THEIR LIVES.
KIND REGARDS,
TED.

marc
Member
Guest

The Anderson male 1 on 1 will not be killed by a lioness…if she sees him, see will loop around him

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