Don’t Suffer in Silence | Londolozi Blog

About the Author

James Tyrrell

Alumni

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

View James's profile

11 Comments

on Don’t Suffer in Silence

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Frances Fearnhead
Member
Guest

Reminds me soooo much of when we were over in Madikwe and ‘we’ were tracking the wild dog. My daughter was desperate so was allowed out of the vehicle to nip behind the proverbial nearby bush. As she was just squatting there, an impala rushed by with the dogs in hot pursuit. I’ve never seen anyone leap up and back into the Land Rover so quickly! In fact so quickly that she actually climbed over, instead of opening, the door into the front seat!!! For someone who was extremely squeamish about seeing a kill, she had a ringside seat after we quickly followed the dogs! A moment that lives in the family history, as well as it being told on numerous occasions by the rangers at Tuningi Lodge! At least she hadn’t suffered in silence … which proves you point.

Steve Wall
Member
Guest

Hi James I’m glad to read that it’s not just me as a guest who has to answer the call nature when out. However never entirely comfortable about what may be in or under the chosen bush!

Jeff Rodgers
Member
Guest

One of the very best blogs and after hundreds of game drives, sometime you need to do what you need to do.

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Thank you James, that was very funny, but not for either male or female on a long drive, but the problem is that some of the trees are not wide enough to hide even the skinniest lady or man behind, but when you gotta go, you just have to!!!! Have a great Sunday & week to come 🙂

Senior Moment
Member
Guest

As a long time visitor to Africa , I can say that I have found the flora and fauna of great interest, but the thing that is often of the greatest interest is termite mounds…

Judy Guffey
Member
Guest

I laughed and commiserated. I have never hesitated to ask for a stop anywhere. Managed under a tarp in the rain behind a vehicle. Better safe than sorry.

Nan Sands
Member
Guest

What kind of small camera do you recommend? I have a digital Panasonic with zoom lens of 30.

Sharon Blackburn
Member
Guest

I smiled the whole time I was reading this because, I dare say, we have all been here!! My first visit, I was still reluctant to try the bush toilet – and consequently found myself in a similar situation. Agony! After the initial breakthrough of just giving up that self-conscious worry about being the first one to ask, we now have no problem in asking to “check the tire pressure” or to “look at tracks!” As you said, the key is in the timing! Thanks for this down-to-earth, everyone-thinks-about-it-no-one-wants-to-ask, YES-it-happens-to-rangers-too article!

Barbara
Member
Guest

So many times I’ve been on game drives, but I always thought “that problem is only on the guest-side”.

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

Do not suffer in silence is a very true story of what people on a game drive actually go through and may feel a little bit embarrassed to excuse themselves to answer a call of nature!When the urge is there to relieve oneself,it is better to be just bold enough and say it!I was wondering how safe is it to relieve oneself behind a tree in the wild?!At picnic sites it is possible but can you just jump out of the vehicle and go behind a tree exposing yourself to a surprise attack from a Lion or Leopard?!

James Tyrrell
Alumni

Hi Tim,
Thanks for the comments. The guide will always check to see if it safe before allowing anyone to disembark the vehicle…

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile