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Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

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23 Comments

on Lions Kill Leopard: A Tribute To The Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male

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Ann Seagle
Member
Guest

Sad story. Well told. Very special. Thank u.

Warren Pearson
Member
Guest

Great tribute Amy. Sad to hear of his passing.

Robert Levy
Member
Guest

Thanks Amy for the story. Thanks also for the best safari experience. Want to shoot again with you!

MJ Bradley
Member
Guest

Another of our mighty warriors has passed into memory. I heard this story of his being adopted by his grandmother from Brent Leo-Smith a guide for WildEarth. He was a special leopard that is for sure.. Thank you for sharing the story of this wonderful leopard..

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

That’s a nice story with a sad ending.Any idea how he lost sight in one eye?!

Tim Musumba
Member
Guest

Nice story about the relationship of this male leopard and his grandmother albeit with a sad ending!Any idea what happened to his eye?!Sad that the Tsalala Lionesses attacked him and i guess he must have been caught off guard with no safety of trees around to climb!

sau
Member
Guest

how sad , just to show you there is always something new we learn like this leopard who shared his kill with his grandmom. what a shame he seemed too young to die.

Lynne
Member
Guest

Such an interesting story about a beautiful animal !

Oscar
Member
Guest

RIP great warrior!

Audrey Kubie
Member
Guest

What a wonderful story and tribute to a magnificent animal, in so many aspects. Can someone tell me what the numbers mean (i.e. 3:4 female) when mentioning a particular leopard? Thanks!!!

Ed Hubbard
Member
Guest

What a marvelously written tribute. I am sad to say my wife and I were traveling with Mike Karantonis and we were the ones who discovered the badly injured DRB male. He was still breathing, but not moving. We stayed with him for a while then departed. When we returned a couple of hours later he had dragged himself about 20 meters from where we first sighted him. He never gave up without a fight. He was no longer breathing. It was the saddest day we have spent on safari.

Jill Larone
Member
Guest

I’m so sorry to hear the sad news. Such a great loss and so sad that the DRB male died in such a tragic way. It sounds like he was a very special Leopard who lived an incredible, but too short life.

Tony Goldman
Member
Guest

Fabulous story and tribute.

Stuart Manford
Member
Guest

Thank you for sharing, beautiful story of a beautiful animal

Cynthia House
Member
Guest

There is so much we don’t know about these elusive and enigmatic animals, my favourites of all the big cats. This leopard lived his life well leaving such memories that are wonderful to read, thank you for sharing yours.

Gill Cederwall
Member
Guest

What a beautiful post. So sad but truly wonderful. Thanks for sharing.

tom and Kate
Member
Guest

Great tribute! Well written Amy!
Memories galore…. sad and grateful for all the time spent with a Londolozi Leopard. Xxx

Anna Lee
Member
Guest

As was asked a couple of times above, I’m yearning to know how this magnificent one became blind.

If you can’t explain it briefly for us, is it possible for you to share a link to a different blog post where that part of his story is revealed?

My heart is soooo sad about this turn of events. I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it for several days. My heart is heavy and yet I’m inspired by his uniqueness at the same time.

If you possibly can, please share with us how the Dudley Riverbank 5:5 lost his vision.

With Heartfelt Appreciation, As Always!

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Anna Lee,

No-one is entirely sure what happened to his eye, at least not that I’m aware. I’ve heard various theories, from a spitting cobra to a fight with another leopard, both of which are plausible. I will ask around and if I find something definite I will let you know.
James

Anna Lee
Member
Guest

Thank you so much, James.

You’re awesome!!

MJ Bradley
Member
Guest

The 3:4 numbers are the number of spots above the whiskers on each side.. they are rather unique to each cat

Alan Pollard
Member
Guest

I look forward every day to receiving your blog – it is responsible more than anything else for calling me back to Africa to see, in the flesh, the wonderful wildlife that your excellent pictures portray. My wife Lesley and I will be back in the Sabbi Sand region in early February and we arrive in Londolozi on 8th February. We are looking forward very much to meeting many of you again and to enjoying the rich diversity of your exceptional Game Reserve. Alan

Great article. What amazing cats. I just love it how he returned the favour and took care of his grandmother in her time of need when she took him under her wing during his time of need. What a beautiful relationship.

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