Where has the Nanga Female Leopard Gone? | Londolozi Blog

About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Alumni

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

View Amy's profile

12 Comments

on Where has the Nanga Female Leopard Gone?

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

S.w. Tsang
Member
Guest

she like all big cats are so beautiful

Ann Seagle
Member
Guest

Gosh! I hope u see her soon and write about it.

Judy B.
Member
Guest

She is my favorite leopard, too. We were fortunate to see and photograph her blue-eyed cub and were so sad to here the news about the baby.

Mary Moy
Member
Guest

You can watch the video repeatedly, so beautiful. Hope she is safe.

Krishna
Member
Guest

Amy Thankyou so much for that adorable video, my heart skipped a beat when that baby leopard came bounding out
Of the bush to his Mum.
We will look forward to more news of these two.

Theresia J Crosby
Member
Guest

A truly heartwarming story. Keep looking…she will surprise you I’m sure!

Caroline
Member
Guest

I remember that cub so well. I hope to see her when I’m back this year.

Brian C
Member
Guest

Nanga in trouble I think ( my internet down, commenting via cell which I hope is coherent). Nanga once had territory north of Londo in addition to current territory. In north she was called Moya. According to EP Rangers, Ximpalapala and Salaxye pushed Nanga out of her Northern Territory (Salaxye is Nanga’s Aunt technically, territorial north of Londo). Tutlwa is hostile to the south and has even killed Nanga’s cubs. To the east, the seldom seen Maliliwane was reported to have given birth in Dec. She could be pressuring her independent daughter to leave her territory. EP Rangers also reported the newly independent Maliliwane young female ( they call her Tsalani and Maliliwane =Kwatile) exploring Nanga’s Northern Territory. It seems all of Nanga’s neighbors are nibbling away at her territory. Nanga is clever and she may hold on yet. Actually I enjoy all of these leopards and hope they all manage to coexist but it will be interesting to see what happens

Thanks Brian. All very true indeed but as you say, she is a resilient leopard and I’m confident we’ll continue to see lots more of her in the future. We’ll keep you updated..

TED SWINDON
Member
Guest

HI AMY,
THANKS FOR THE GREAT BLOG ON NANGA.
I CONCUR THAT OF HER GENERATION, SHE IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL OF ALL THE FEMALES AT LONDOLOZI.
I HAVE VIEWED HER SINCE JUST AFTER HER BIRTH, SO LIKE YOU, I HOPE WE WILL STILL HAVE MANY MORE OPPORTUNITIES TO VIEW HER.
KEEP WELL, AND HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN SOON.
KIND REGARDS,
TED.

Lynn Rattray
Member
Guest

Thank you so much, Amy, for posting news on the Nanga leopard. Having viewed her with her very first litter, she took up permanent residence in my heart and soul. She is so beautiful and such a loving mother. Please keep us posted on this incredible leopard. Any word on her surviving male cub? You made my day knowing that you are on the lookout for Nanga!

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

I hope Nanga is well and out there somewhere and will show herself again shortly. She is one of the most beautiful Leopards. It broke my heart when she lost her little blue-eyed cub, but she has proven that she is resilient and I am hoping that she will return soon and we can all breath a sigh of relief. Please keep us posted Amy.

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile