About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy worked at Londolozi from 2014 to 2017, guiding full time before moving into the media department, where her photographic and story-telling skills shone through. Her deep love of all things wild and her spiritual connection to Africa set her writing and guiding ...

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10 Comments

on The Pangolin: Ten Things You Should Know about the World’s Most Trafficked Animal

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Marinda Drake
Member
Guest

Great blog Amy. Interesting facts. Unfortunately I have never seen a pangolin in the wild. I hope I will be able to see one some day and that they never become extinct. We need to create awareness of the plight of these endangered animals and the fact that they are not going to cure any illnesses. We need to keep them safe for future generations.

colin mccabe
Member
Guest

Hi Amy as you may recall Brandon and I came looking for this wonderful creature in the Ngala area not so long ago. Still have not seen one but will try again this winter. Thanks for a great article. Regards Colin

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Colin. Of course I remember! I remember we even went scouting around that one particular termite mound in the west of the reserve where a pangolin had been seen a couple of times; sadly to no avail. Any luck with the aardvarks or aardwolfs? Please send love to Brandon. I hope he is still working towards becoming a ranger one day!

Christa Blessing
Member
Guest

Dear Amy and dear all at Londolozi,
I just love reading all your articles on Londolozi’s wildlife. Some make me really sad, like the one about the baby leopard who got killed, others I find so informative, like the one on the Pangolin.
Every day when I read one of your blogs I just wish I could be at Londolozi again (I tried to come in May, however, you were fully booked – next year, maybe).
What can we do to help preserve this wonderful African wildlife? I don’t know, though I think what we should try is educate, educate and educate people. Tell all your Chinese guests (and of course, if there are any, the Vietnamese as well) that they should stop using parts of wild animals for so-called medical or other purposes. Stop ALL hunting, also legal hunting, because it confuses things.
I am going to have a talk on African wildlife and safaris in southern and eastern Africa here in Switzerland in February 2016 and you can be sure that I will stress the fact that so many of these wonderful animals are going to become extinct because of mankind’s foolish behavior. On my homepage e.g. I propagate the use of human horn (hair, clippings of nails) instead of rhino horn. I have also written to European zoos to educate people as the zoo in Singapore has done for many years that they should not use iron, or eat pangolins, or buy products made of ivory.
Kind regards and thanks again for your great blogs,
Christa

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Christa. Thank you very much for your thoughts. It is so true that education is primary to the success of conservation. It sounds like you are doing fantastic work in Switzerland, so thank you for your support! We look forward to seeing you back here at Londolozi.

Christa Blessing
Member
Guest

Sorry: mistake in my post:

it should be horn of course, not “iron” in my last sentence.

Ann Seagle
Member
Guest

Thank u for always being our teacher.

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Very interesting blog Amy and shocking statistics on the numbers being trafficked! Hopefully through education, this will end and this very special animal will thrive in numbers again. I had never even heard of a Pangolin until I was at Londolozi 2 years ago, but I’ve never been fortunate enough to actually see one. Your pictures are incredible…thank you so much for sharing!

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Oh this makes me so sad & angry that all our beautiful wildlife seems to becoming “potions” for idiots to do what??? They belong where they are & not be harmed! Always love seeing these wonderful blogs thank you Amy. Your blog is very factual & so interesting 🙂

Gary R. Collins, AIA
Member
Guest

The Chinese have such a large population and espouse so many unscientific notions regarding health potions, sexual potency, and “good” fortune that they must take the major responsibility for providing the market for destruction of unique and endangered species. Pangolin scales? Tiger penises? Shark fins? Manta Ray meat? Unconscionable, period. Sometimes the feet of the culpable simply must be held to the fire.

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