About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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11 Comments

on Young Female Leopards: Carving a Niche

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Marinda Drake
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Interesting blog. Both beautiful leopards.

Karen Conley
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I look forward every morning to your posts, the leopards are fantastic, as well as the wild dogs (my personal favorite) you make my day every day!

Dave Mills
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Thanks James. As always, beautiful photos, sound research, and interesting insights. Thanks from one who has to join you vicariously from about 16,000 km away.

Kevin
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TYF!!!!!! But admittedly, I am biased, saw her this past August. Kill in tree and playing on an embankment with a hoof from it. The landy was positioned do I was back right and right at the bottom of the embankment. She came flipping down the hill, playing with the hoof and skidded to a halt right in front of me. Yea TYF!!!

Kevin
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Ps – thanks JT!!

MJ
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In a different part of the Sabi Sands live the leopard Karula.. She had a territory next to her mother Safari.. Karula actually had her first set of cubs at about 2 1/2 yrs.. She has raised her past 4 litters 2 females, 2 males, male & female and 2 males to majority.. This year she was know to have one cub which was taken by hyenas.. Karula will be 11 this March.. I love that the Sabi Sands can follow their leopards and know the genealogy for generations.. Thank you for the update.. Both Mashaba and Tamboti are beautiful ladies.

Brian C
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To your point, Karula is the only leopardess in Sabi Sands recent times (that I know) that raised more cubs to independence than Sunset Bend, 8 to 7 (not that its a competition).

Jill Grady
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Very interesting James, and the map is helpful to see the size of each territory. Is it possible that the Tamboti Young female will move more into her mother’s territory, which is quite large, as her mother ages…or is it too soon to be able to do that? I saw the Tamboti Young female back in Sept. 2013 when she was a young cub — she was very sweet and full of mischief and now she has grown into such a beauty, as has the Mashaba Young female as well. It’s good to see them both doing so well.

James T
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Hi Jill,

It is certainly possible.
The Tamboti female’s large territory can be partly explained by the fact that the leopards she inherited it from/pushed out were the Nottens female (deceased) and the Dudley Riverbank female (old and frail). Two females who were not really any competition for her. Should the Tamboti female raise more female offspring, it is likely that they will snatch up corners of their mother’s territory.

And the Tamboti Young female is STILL full of mischief!!

James

Jill Grady
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Hi James, it’s great to hear that the Tamboti Young female can still stir things up!! I love hearing how she and Young Mashaba are both thriving and doing so well on their own. Thanks for the great update and the beautiful images James!

Jill

Brian C
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Wonderful blog about 2 of my favorite up and coming young female leopards. I hope they both stick around. Maybe their mothers will relinquish some more territory and they can split the red area, with Mashaba Young female in the north and Tamboti Young female to the south.

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