Create a Bushveld Garden this Spring | Londolozi Blog

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Ryan James

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I am the Head of Development at Londolozi's not-for-profit partner organisation, the Good Work Foundation (GWF). GWF focuses on education, in particular helping people living in rural areas to connect to a new, digital Africa and all of its opportunities.

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on Create a Bushveld Garden this Spring

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marinda drake
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Fantastic blog. Thanks so much Ryan and Kenneth. I love gardening and try to plant mostly indigenous. It grow so much easier, and attract loads of birds. Planted the boabab out last month, hope it counts for arbor week, and the long tail cassia (sjambok pod) seeds came out, got 2 small seedlings already. I will definitely ask Kenneth a few questions when I visit.

Ryan James
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Great stuff Marinda. We are lucky to live in a climate that allows for such beautiful and diverse gardens. Good luck with the Baobab.

Kate Collins
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Thank you Ryan and Kenneth. I am feeling very inspired. Caitlin and I are in the process of creating our own indigenous bushveld garden and completed the first session today. I’ll keep you updated on our progress.

Ryan James
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Can’t wait to see some photos Kate and Caitlin!

Wendy0210
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Thanks Kenneth & Ryan for this interesting blog. My garden in Alberton is 90% indigenous with a lot of aloes, that have not rotted from the rain, but I treasure them & so do the birds. I do have a paw paw & avo & both have been very generous. Look forward to Kate & Caitlin’s pictures.

Ryan James
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Hi Wendy. I am going to start asking the experts which indigenous trees are best for attracting the birds … look out for a blog. Let us know which of your trees the birds love most. Ryan

Wendy0210
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Thanks Ryan, I might add that my garden is 400sqm & I have two Cotoneaster trees that flower, attract bees & butterflies, then get lovely red berries, which the Mousebirds, bulbuls, barbets, grey loeries,glossy starlings, weavers & more love to eat. A big plus for them, but they are not indigenous, but I enjoy watching the bird parade 🙂

Jill Grady
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Guest

Interesting blog Ryan and Kenneth, and thanks for all the great tips! I love gardening as well and will definitely try your tips out Kenneth. The gardens are beautiful at Londolozi and must be difficult to maintain with all the Nyala close by, interested in all the plants…how do you keep everything from being eaten?!

Ryan James
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Hi Jill. It’s a pleasure 🙂 To answer your question, one of the many upsides of aloe species is that they are unpalatable and often dangerous to eat. Hence Kenneth’s strategy of incorporating more and more of this species. As for the rest of the plants, they’re all part of a natural environment, which means they are prey for some 🙂

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

Thanks Ryan, I didn’t know that about aloe plants. It’s great to learn something new. Kenneth is certainly keeping the gardens beautiful there!

Willemien
Member
Guest

Hi Kenneth
I am struggling with a large open area under trees and nothing seems to grow there.. and whatever shoots up the nyalas eat,or warthogs dig up. We dont have fencing around the property to keep anything out. What can I plant that will grow under trees, that is indigenous and the nyala wont eat? Willemien from Hoedspruit

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