Majingilane: Still in Control | Londolozi Blog

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James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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on Majingilane: Still in Control

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Brandon
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Hi James.. Do you think the majingilne are biting off more than they can chew with them expanding their territory to the west? Surly at some stage some new males from up north or even Kruger will come over and try a take over?
Brandon

James T
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Hi Brandon,
It all depends, as for now no coalition is pushing into their territory. Once things settle in the west and the roars of the Majingilane are no longer as frequent in their initial eastern areas, other males may set their sights on the Tsalala and Sparta prides.
For now though, I am pretty confident the Majingilane will be aware of any incursions and move to repulse them.
James

Jill Grady
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Very interesting blog James. There is nothing more impressive than seeing the big male lions altogether! Hopefully they will stay on Londolozi and protect their prides.

amy
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James,
Thank you for your updates regarding the Majingilane! I do hope they stay around enough to keep the cubs safe. Both the Sparta and Tsalala prides depend on them to watch over the area so their cubs can reach maturity. I hate reading about the loss of so many cubs as the turmoil continues with the Selatis, the Sandriver males, etc.
Amy

Gixxor
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Please continue with the updates. It’s really amazing that these brothers stick together and continue to dominate the sands and beyond.

Ian
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I’ve been wondering how to coinrtbute ever since I originally read about Londolozi in the blog: John and David Varty, who inherited the land when they were teenagers. Since then, they’ve repaired massive swathes of land all over Africa. According to one of the geologists who’s helped them do this, it would cost $38 billion dollars to repair every ecosystem on earth. Repairing the earths’ ecosystems sounds like a great place to start changing the world, and $38b doesn’t seem so out of reach, not with fellow team members like Oprah. I searched online and couldn’t even find a way to donate to the Vartys’ private efforts. Martha, help!

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