About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

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10 Comments

on A Leopard’s Wanderings

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Mark Ridl
Member
Guest

Hi James,

As always, brilliant! Setting the scene and giving insight into the ever changing leopard dynamics. As an avid follower of the blog, it is great to see a map that can give me some perspective. Each post I read about the different areas on the property and it is great to have an overview, even if it is from afar.
I just wanted to let you know the map helps set the scene in our heads when you guys write about your awesome adventures, we can now pin point where you have been and where you are heading.

Cheers,
Mark.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Mark,

Thanks for your feedback. The map will hopefully become a regular feature in pinpointing areas described in the posts.

James

Leslie Backus
Member
Guest

I did not find the Ximpalapala female listed as one of the Londolozi leopards. Is she know by another name as well?
Thanks

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Leslie,

She is a recent addition to the Leopard’s of Londolozi, as we have only been seeing her since last year. We believe she drifted into the area from west of us since the death/disappearance of the Nyelethi Female in late 2011.

James

Shardool Kulkarni
Member
Guest

Could her changed demeanour and totally different territory mean that this is a different female who looks similar to the ximpalapala female. Or could this mean that her missing sister is territorial between the territory of this female and her mother. Explaining the gap in the two territories. Btw what happened to the daughter of nottens female born in June 2006

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Shardool,

We are pretty much 100% sure that it is the same female. Possibly her missing sister is still out there somewhere (although she is still far too young to be territorial, ie. actively defending a territory) but it is more likely that she has been killed. Around about the time we stopped seeing the cubs for a couple of months the Gowrie male leopard started being seen around Ximpalapala koppie, and as we do not believe he is the father of the cubs, it may have been him who killed her.
I’ll have to check on the 2006 Nottens female’s daughter for you…

James

Shardool Kulkarni
Member
Guest

Ok! Your theory that the male killed her sister seems likely
But I thought female leopards are philopatric, i.e. they set up next to their mother’s home range. Btw please do let me know about notten’s daughter. 🙂

Richard
Member
Guest

Agree that the map makes a big difference and would love to see it available as a link etc.
So looking forward to our first visit next August.

Jill Grady
Member
Guest

I love your photos and blogs James, you write beautifully. I agree with Mark, the map helps tremendously. I was wondering, if the leopards or Cheetahs are severely injured , are they ever provided with medical care to aid in their survival, since they are endangered, or do you always let nature take its course?

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Jill,

The policy here is generally one of non-intervention ie. letting nature take it’s course, unless the injury was human-caused.
In the case of an endangered animal like a cheetah we may intervene and treat the animal, but bear in mind the treatment of an animal is not without it’s risks, and there are many cases of tranquilized animals not recovering from the drugs administered to them.

James

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