About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills that complemented his Honours degree in Zoology meant that he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the ...

View James's profile

13 Comments

on The State of the Vomba Female

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Rae
Member
Guest

Very cool. I am so appreciative of the blog and your extensive history of the leopard and lion lineages around Londolozi. It is going to make my return in a few weeks even more entertaining for me than last year, as I now have a clear understanding of the sagas that play out.

Therese Cooper
Member
Guest

We had a wonderful sighting of the Vomba female and her (very big) cub less than a month ago with Bennet and Alfie. Although I’ve put that on my list of great sightings of all times, after this beautifully written piece I really understand how blessed we were to see the two of them playing, stalking one another, pouncing and wrestling.
We even had the good luck of seeing the Marthly male (the father as I understand) just nearby with the kill he stolen from the female the day before. The young male would try to get a little bite of the impala from time to time but the very load growling of the father kept him from venturing too close.
I got some wonderful photographs of the mother and son – Oh, how I treasure them now!

Tony Goldman
Member
Guest

Fabulous information as always,James,we were fortunate to have a wonderful siting of the Vomba female and her cub in February this year out in the open with Alfie and Bennet and a quality hour with them.

Sandy Johnson
Member
Guest

Great story and pictures James. I had the pleasure of watching this beautiful animal for quite some time on my trip to Londolozi. It was a treat although at the time I didn’t realize how much so. Long live Vomba.

Katie Siegel
Member
Guest

Great photos JT

Sheila
Member
Guest

Another well written, fantastic blog. It’s wonderful to see these leopards live out their lives and make it to and even past their life expectancy and still raising cubs too. Thank you for bringing these amazing animals of Africa to those of us who may never get the chance to see them ‘in person’.

Sepp
Member
Guest

An incredibly intelligent and beautiful leopard and one that always makes you hold your breath in awe. I only saw her a few times but she remains one of my favourite leopards. Thanks for this piece.

Judy Guffey
Member
Guest

Mother and cub….what a fantastic picture! Thanks.

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Oh James, how special is this story! Thank you so much for sharing something that I can only wish for but it does give me a thrill reading & looking at the magnificent pics all the Sabi Sand sites put on, yes I see them all. Thank you and long may that magnificent Lady Leopard live to see another cub or two grow up.

Byron
Member
Guest

Well written James. I remember both Vomba and Nottens females from my time there and in some ways sad that they are fast approaching the end of their life cycle. Yet, they have lived full, successfull lives affording great viewing. Vomba was not only hard to find but also difficult to follow because she loved moving into dry river beds, with many rangers getting stuck. I am hoping to see Nottens female again if and when I can, on my next visit. When I first arrived at Londolozi to guide permanently, she was still dependant on her mother, 3:4 female and we had great sightings of them, including her brother, when they were all together.

James
Member
Guest

Hi Byron,

Thanks for your comments. You’ll be glad to know that many rangers are STILL getting stuck while following the Vomba female!
Nottens just keeps on going, and has been seen mating with the Maxabene 3:3 young male on SS. We have her down as being born in 1995. Can you confirm this?

James

Byron
Member
Guest

James, apologies for the late reply. Unfortunately I can’t confirm the birth date of Nottens female, however, Stoff was guiding then and I think he viewed her when she was a young cub. 1995 sounds about right though, as I joined Londolozi from Ngala in April 1996 and she was still with 3:4 but it was not too long afterwards that she started to become independent.

MJ
Member
Guest

We will enjoy her story for as long as it lasts and then let her legend live on through her progeny.
The Sabi Sands is indeed the Land of Leopards. Thank you for sharing her and Londolozi with us!

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

One moment...
Anonymous
Be the first to this photo
You and 1 others this photo
q

Filed under
Anonymous
10 April, 2798
+
Add Profile