25 Comments

on The Week in Pictures # 11

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Merle
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Talley,

I’m going to love looking at your blog every week. You even have a “Merle” photo (impala lillies).
Miss you, Freddie and our 12 hr. drives. Give my regards to Shayne next time you see him. I look forward to watching him grow up.

Your photos are breath taking (away)!

Merle

Talley Smith
Contributor

Thanks Merle, Shayne is growing before our very eyes and getting into more and more trouble! David Dampier will be posting some great shots of their latest shenanigans soon so keep an eye out. Miss you guys!!

Sheena
Member
Guest

Tyson needs his head looking at for keeping such a beauty waiting and then scrapping with her! Maybe he had a headache !!!
It is wonderful the way you re-connect us to Londolozi and take us on a journey through your words and magnificent photographs. I am in awe of your talent young lady.
With thanks to all of you who work on the Blog and give us such pleasure – here’s wishing you a great weekend …

Rich Laburn
Member

Thanks Sheena, have a fantastic weekend as well. So pleased to hear that the blog continues to re-connect you back to Londolozi and gives you so much enjoyment. Rich

Talley Smith
Contributor

You’re right Sheena, Tyson is certainly living up to his ‘bad boy’ image! Thanks so much for checking out the pics 🙂

Geri Potter
Member
Guest

Those are some truly beautiful pictures! And I say GOOD for the Vomba female! But the incredible birds and the leopards just take my breath away and make me want to come back! And the Impala lilies are gorgeous! Don’t have any pictures of those! I am looking forward to watching how your spring and summer unfold as we in Massachusetts head toward autumn and winter! It’s always a pleasure to revisit through your blog! Thank you.

Talley Smith
Contributor

Thanks Geri, I am trying to focus more on the birds, so I’m glad you’re enjoying them. The heat is definitely on… the migrants should be coming back soon!

Penny Parker
Member
Guest

One of my favourite “Week in Pictures”. This one has been a special delight.

Talley Smith
Contributor

Thanks Penny, this week was special for me too 🙂

Liz
Member
Guest

Just stunning … thank you for taking me on a journey to my beloved bush … the Vomba female is a pretty little lady, so no overkill in photos, she really loves the camera and I love seeing her. So glad 5:5 Dudley male healing – he is special. Many thanks Londolozi and all the team.

Rich Laburn
Member

Couldn’t agree with you more about the Vomba Young Female Liz. She is the image of a perfect female leopard. Thanks for your comments and glad you enjoyed the pics. Rich

Talley Smith
Contributor

I recently got a closer visual of 5:5 and he is healing, but it’s quite a scar on his lip! I hope to include a photo next week. Vomba and her daughter the Vomba Young Female remain favourites of all the rangers.

Jo Lynne Jones
Member
Guest

Question about the young Vomba female. We saw her mating with Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male repeatedly in May. Would she still be seeking mates if she were pregnant?

Talley Smith
Contributor

Hi Jo Lynne, just out of curiosity, did you actually see the Vomba Young Female mating with 5:5 or was she just courting him? Or perhaps you’re referring to the Vomba Female?

The answer is no, she shouldn’t still be seeking mates if she were pregnant. However, female leopards sometimes mate with unfamiliar males if they are pregnant or have small cubs for appeasement/distraction reasons. Male leopards sometimes kill the cubs of unfamiliar females. The theory is, a male won’t bother future cubs of a female if he has mated with her (as he is presumably the father). And females have been seen to ‘lure away’ unfamiliar males from their cubs/den sites by enticing him to mate, so that he doesn’t pose any risk to her cubs. In these cases she is not receptive, and it is said that both lion and leopard are of the few mammals who will mate for reasons other than reproduction.

JO LYNNE JONES
Member
Guest

I’m a little late in replying – yes, it was the Vomba 3:2 Female that we saw mating with Dudley Riverbank 5:5 in May. I had trouble finding a shot that showed her left side clearly. Elmon took some good video of the event. Inspiring to see his enthusiasm for these animals after so many years of observing them.
I have been confused when there are references to the Vomba Female on the blog. I am going to assume that any reference to Vomba Female means the 3:2 and that Vomba Young is the 3:3.
Thank you for the information on female lions and leopards protective mating practices.

From now on I will keep my Vomba females straight,

Rich Laburn
Member

Haha it can be a bit trick at times Jo Lynne, but just you are correct in assuming that the Vomba Female is the Vomba 3:2 Female and the mother of the Vomba 3:3 Young Female. For a more detailed understanding of these leopards and their spot patterns, be sure to check out the Leopards of Londolozi website – http://www.londolozi.com/leopards

Judy Guffey
Member

Freddy was my daily hero while out in the bush. Amazing ability to sight ….and he was a wizard with my small camera….taking video footage while I lumbered away trying to perfect my photo technique with a Nikon (and Mike Miller tried patiently to guide me through that process.) Love seeing these photos and daily planning on when I can return.

Talley Smith
Contributor

Freddy is a true genius in the art of tracking, and his humility, kindness and love of all animals amazes me more and more each day. I’m so glad you had the opportunity to spend time with him, and hope to see you back here soon!

Willy Smith
Member
Guest

Always impressive Talley! I would like to know what the numerics after a leopards name mean….ie. 5:5?
UW

Rich Laburn
Member

Hi Willy, the numerics refer to the spot patters on either side of the leopards snout. Each leopard will have an individual spot pattern which helps us to identify him or her. To find out a bit more about the spot patterns and see some clear examples, visit our Leopards of Londolozi website – http://www.londolozi.com/leopards . Thanks for your questions. Rich

Willy Smith
Member
Guest

Thank you Rich,
I was guessing at 4:5 being the fouth out of five cubs, so I am glad you cleared up this for me. I looked at the web site too. As we all know a leopard never changes his spots(!), that does make an excellent method of identification.
Thanks,
Willy

Jane West
Member
Guest

Talley your blog teaches me something every week! Didnt know about the leopard showing the white of it’s tail meaning it wasn’t cruising for dinner! Love the two bee eaters!

Nix Illes
Member

Awesome images, and love those impala lillies! Great to see some of the fab Londoz plants included in the blog as well as the magical beasts!

Patsy Weingart
Member
Guest

My favorite collection of photos so far.

lyndy
Member
Guest

Always awesome!

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