About the Author

Rob Jeffery

Field Guide

Rob joined the Londolozi team at the start of 2017. Having grown up on a farm in the Cape and spending many holidays traveling Southern Africa he developed a love for the outdoors and an appreciation for the natural world. After completing a ...

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7 Comments

on What Does A Hundred Thousand Birds Look Like?

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Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Interesting blog Rob. We have also noticed huge flocks of quelea. Interesting that you mention the field mice. We actually had more mice in years following a drought.

Lucie Easley
Senior Digital Ranger

Isn’t nature amazing! It can certainly seem ugly and punishing at times (depending on perspective as in lion vs buffalo) then overwhelming with glory and abundance. Thanks for sharing this documentation of these changes at Londolozi.

Darlene Knott
Senior Digital Ranger

We have seen the quelea ‘doing their thing’–it is amazing! Your explanation as to why the quelea showed up en masse this year because of the drought and resulting annual grasses was excellent. Thanks for explaining so well, Rob.

A B
Explorer

It’s nice to see the red-billed Queleas any time. I’ve never been to Londolozi itself but saw these birds in Kruger in flocks aye. Those birds are so fascinating -could watch them for hours.
Interesting post!

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

Definetely one of the best Londolozi videos I’ve ever see. Gut-renching and heart-warming at the same time. The perfect reminder that life can bounce back even after the worst times. The transformation looked amazing! Could really use some of that raind here in Cape Town!

Leonie De Young
Explorer

What a great blog Rob. It was heartbreaking to watch the video of the drought, but heartwarming to see the transformation following the much needed rain. I think the formation of the quelea is called a murmuration. I have seen a video taken in Britain of the starlings doing what you have described. Thanks for the great explanations and to Amy and James for the video.

Eulalia Angédu
Explorer

Very interesting blog there Rob.The simultaneous transformation has proved that nature has control over the ecosystems that depend on it for efficient survival.That video is magical.Awesome work.

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