Once again I’ve been astonished by the standard of photographs captured by our team of rangers this month. If you haven’t had a chance to check out every blog, this one is your go-to post for the very best of September. These are for me the top, stand out images but you may have differing thoughts. Don’t be shy to share your opinion on who your winner for September would be in the comments section below.

Enjoy…

One of the Nkoveni female leopard’s cubs photographed as it peers over the drying grass in search of the hoisted impala kill. Photograph by Alex Jordan

5
Nkoveni 2:2 Female
2012 - present

A young female that lives to the east and south of camp. Easily recognised by her 2:2 spot pattern she is often to be found in Marula trees.

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Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Lineage
Sunsetbend
Identification
markings
Timeline
45 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist
buffalo, Londolozi, CA

A Cape buffalo stares into the vehicle as the rest of the herd wallow in the mud. These large herds have been concentrating on the southwestern parts of Londolozi, looking forward to the coming rains and the nutritious grasses likely to grow as a result. Photograph by Callum Gowar

lions, Sand River, AS

The sub-adult Breakaway female used the opportunity while the kudu weren’t watching, to scuttle across the Sand River. From there she aimed to position herself in a way that she could flank the unsuspecting kudu from the southern bank. Photograph by Alistair Smith

White-fronted bee-eaters are seen here dust bathing on one of the tracks of Londolozi in the late afternoon. These birds throw sand over themselves and roll in the dust to help rid themselves of parasites. Photograph by Grant Rodewijk

One of the Tsalala Breakaway pride cubs slakes its thirst in a pool in the Sand River. The angle and lighting are what make this sighting particularly special. Photograph by Alistair Smith

dwarf mongoose, Londolozi, CA

A relaxed dwarf mongoose peers out of a termite mound that it uses as a place of safety to evade birds of prey and other predators. Here, this dwarf mongoose was sunning itself in the early hours of the morning. Photograph by Callum Gowar

CA, elephant, Londolozi

Two elephant bulls hone their skills whilst play fighting in a nearby dam. The warmer temperatures often result in elephants fully submerging themselves in water to cool down.

A startled hippo breaks cover from the reeds and lunges back towards a deeper pool. It is amazing how such a dangerous animal still feels so vulnerable when out of its aquatic habitat and is so easily startled as a result. Photograph by Fin Lawlor

One of the Nkoveni female’s cubs (the other is indistinguishable in the top right of the tree as its silhouette has merged with those of the branches) peers down to where a hyena was prowling. Photograph by James Tyrrell

The dry season along the Sand River never disappoints. As dry conditions prevail the river provides a constant source of water to quench many an animal’s thirst. Photograph by James Souchon

A young African jacana moves along the bank of the Sand River. Its enormously elongated toes enable it to wade out onto the lily pads and other aquatic plants. Photograph by James Souchon.

This Spotted eagle owl was disturbed from its daytime perch by one of the Nkoveni female’s young cubs as it tried to stalk it. Well camouflaged, these birds are rarely seen during the day, and generally only when flushed. Photograph by James Souchon

The Ndzanzeni female and her male cub slake their thirst as the morning and daytime temperatures continue to soar. As you can see from the photograph, they are very similar in size now. Photograph by Callum Gowar

This female is a success story all in herself, being born as a single cub to the Dudley Riverbank female in early 2012.

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13 sightings by Members
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Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Lineage
Mother Leopard
Identification
markings
Timeline
16 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist

The Nkoveni female’s cubs play a prolonged game of catch-me-if-you-can through this bare marula tree. Sadly since this photograph was taken, one of the youngsters has been killed by the Flat Rock male. Photograph by Rob Jeffery

The Ntsevu pride and one Majingilane male photographed as they attempt to bring down a buffalo. The weight and strength of the male lion was what the buffalo eventually succumbed to. Photograph by Grant Rodewijk

red-billed quelea, JT

A flock of red-billed quelea swarm around a small pool in the Sand River, landing for just a few seconds to drink and clean themselves. There are an estimated 1,5 billion red-billed quelea on the planet. Photograph by James Tyrrell

Filed under Photography Wildlife

Involved Leopards

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

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You've seen this leopard
Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

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You've seen this leopard

About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy has a rich field-guiding history, having spent time at both Phinda and Ngala Game Reserves. This diversity of past guiding locations brought her an intimate understanding of different biomes across South Africa, and she immediately began making a name for herself as ...

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15 Comments

on 16 of September’s Stunning Images You Should Share

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Gabriele La

my fav is the second one. That black and white photo of the buffalo is outstanding

Marinda Drake

Stunning images. The Ndzanzeni female drinking with her male cub is realy wonderful. Love the elephants.

Lisa Hilger

All are amazing! I have to go with the buffalo as my fav and then the dwarf mongoose. Callum just seems to have captured both of these animals so uniquely; the detail and coloring made me pause to really look at the detail of the photos.
Cheers!!
Lisa

Richard Allan

The two elephants crossing the Sand River stands out for me.

Leonie De Young

There really is no way to choose just one. All the pictures are amazing. I would not wish to be the judge choosing the best of the bunch. Thank you so much for sharing these with us.

Ian Hall

The black and white buffalo is certainly outstanding as is the female leopard drinking with her cub, but the owl photo is really cute. I must admit that buffalo photos are something I have always found difficult.

Darlene Knott

I so enjoy the photos you share! I look forward to it every day! Thanks to all of you.

Denise Vouri

Bravo to the team. Absolutely stunning images, especially the cub captured “in flight”!

Wendy Macnicol

I really like the little Dwarf Mongoose who seems to be looking almost directly at the camera. I also love the first one of the young Nkoveni cub marching with a very purposeful look on it’s face to it’s supper which has been caught by Mum. Dinner is served!

Carolyn Whitaker

Alex’s photo of the Nkoveni female’s cub is at the top of my list, too, Amy. The photos are all outstanding, as usual! Your writing is always inspiring and touches my heart. It was an honor to meet you in May, too! — Your “Fan Girl” from Chicago

Mauricia Neeley

I love the cubs playing in the tree. sad that one is gone, but that is nature. But have to say my favorite is the silhouette of the young leopard in the tree.

Jill Larone

Wow, these are all really incredible, but I think my favourite is Grant’s photo of the White-fronted Bee-eaters. The light is really beautiful and I love the low angle capture.

A B

Same here. All the pictures are stunning but the White-fronted bee-eaters is my favourite.

Rich Laburn

Love the shot of the Nkoveni female silhouetted in the tree! Quintessential africa at its best!

Callum Evans

All of those photographs are incredible! If I had to choose though, I’d either go for Callum Gowar’s photo of the Ndzanzeni Female and her cub drinking, the African jacana by James Souchon or the leopard cub in mid-takeoff by Rob Jeffery.

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