The Week in Pictures is a wonderful way to showcase the diversity of wildlife experienced at Londolozi, and the best thing about it, is that no two weeks are ever the same. In fact, no two days are ever the same here, and every game drive is a new opportunity to see and experience something totally different.

The past seven days have undoubtedly made up one of the most memorable weeks of my guiding career thus far. The sightings not only of individual animal species, but of interactions between species, is something that will forever be etched in my mind.

I hope you enjoy the images as much as my guests and I enjoyed these wonderful moments together.

Enjoy this Week in Pictures…

We waited in anticipation as a breeding herd of elephants approached a watering hole at great speed. These animals can drink as much as 120 liters in one day. 1/800 at f6.3 ISO 1600

The scar-nosed Majingilane male has been seen on his own for quite some time now. A few mornings ago was no different. We watched as he roared while patrolling and scent marking through his territory. 1/800 at f6.3, ISO 1600

Giraffes can be challenging to photograph given their sheer size, and because of the tricky habitat they are normally found in. However, close-up shots can reveal incredible detail, like the long hairs on their lips, that may otherwise be missed. 1/3200 at f6.0 ISO 500

A multitude of vultures perch in a series of dead trees, waiting for the pride of lions below to move off from their buffalo kills. The gloomy grey skies made for an appropriate black and white conversion. 1/2000 at f6.0 ISO 500

The king of the skies. A martial eagle flies off from its day-time perching spot after being mobbed relentlessly by a pair of fork-tailed drongos. 1/8000 at f6.3 ISO 1000

The dark-maned Majingilane male photographed at the end of a yawn. Darkness is certainly no reason to pack your camera away. Having an understanding of a few basic in-camera settings could result in you capturing an entirely unique set of images that you never thought you were capable of capturing. The ins and outs of night photography is something we will be featuring in the next few weeks on the Londolozi blog. 1/160 at f2.8 ISO 3200

A Tsalala Breakaway male yawns before getting up and beginning to hunt. This was taken on manual mode, a mode that often terrifies amateur photographers. I’d encourage you to take a look at the camera settings written below though, which help to give you the ball park range of settings used to capture action at night. 1/200 at f2.8 ISO 3200

One of the most incredible moments I have ever witnessed out in the bush! This Majingilane male came running towards us at full speed, trailing an Ntsevu lioness who had stolen a common duiker kill from a leopard moments before. 1/8000 at f5.6 ISO 1800

The remaining Nkoveni cub moves through an open area, being led by its mother to the relative safety of a thicket nearby. 1/6400 at f5.6 ISO 3200

5
Nkoveni 2:2 Female
2012 - present

A young female that lives to the east and south of camp. Easily recognised by her 2:2 spot pattern she is often to be found in Marula trees.

U
Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
23 sightings by Members
q

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Lineage
Sunsetbend
Identification
markings
Timeline
38 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist

The Mhangeni Pride managed to bring down two separate buffalo overnight. We managed to view them the following morning, feeding on what little was left of each carcass. 1/1000 at f6.3 ISO 500

Hunting buffalo is thirsty work. One of the pride females wanders over to a watering hole nearby to quench her thirst. 1/640 at f6.3 ISO 720

It was wonderful to see the Ndzandzeni female again, putting more pressure on her injured back leg. She has been seen on a kill this past week and we’re hoping that it means she’ll be able to make a full recovery. 1/1250 at f5.6 ISO 500

This female is a success story all in herself, being born as a single cub to the Dudley Riverbank female in early 2012.

U
Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
12 sightings by Members
q

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Lineage
Mother Leopard
Identification
markings
Timeline
14 stories
Territory
maps
Parents
2 known
Litters
1 known
Offspring
known
Siblings
known
Videos
playlist

A Mhangeni pride sub-adult rests on top of a termite mound providing me and my guests with this wonderful eye-level photographic opportunity. 1/640 at f6.0 ISO 6400

Similar to the giraffe, an elephant can be a difficult subject to photograph due to its size. Zooming in and getting close is one way though to reveal amazing textures and detail. 1/3200 at f6.2 ISO 3200

With World Rhino Day having happened this past week, my guests and I aimed to capture an iconic rhino shot with the rising sun in the background.   1/3200 at f5.0 ISO 1600

Arguably one of the most photogenic animals in the bush, the zebra makes for an easy subject to photograph, often lending themselves for great black and white conversions due to their already beautiful contrasts. 1/1000 at f6.3 ISO 1600

The Tailless female cautiously crosses the main channel of the Sand River at sunset on a beautiful afternoon spent with the Tsalala Breakaway Pride. In a few months, this channel will hopefully be flowing strongly as the rainy season approaches. 1/1250 at f5.6 ISO 1600

Perhaps the most memorable of all morning game drives this last week was this one spent following a pack of wild dogs as they sprinted through Londolozi. They are the rarest predator we find in southern Africa and are always incredibly exciting to track. 1/3200 at f6.0 ISO 1600

Involved Leopards

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard
Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Nkoveni 2:2 Female

Spotted this leopard?
You've seen this leopard

About the Author

Alistair Smith

Contributor

Alistair left a corporate career to follow his true passion; the great outdoors. He began his guide training in late June of 2016, and thanks to a youth filled with numerous trips to the bushveld, sailed through the course without too much trouble. ...

View Alistair's profile

18 Comments

on The Week in Pictures #302

Join the conversationJoin the conversation

Marinda Drake

Stunning pics this week Alister. Lovely to see the tailless Tsalala female. The Magingilane are realy starting to show their age. Great to see them back on Londolozi.

Alistair Smith

Hi Marinda thank you for commenting. The Majingilane are indeed showing their age, but still doing well to hold such a large territory.

Gillian Lacey

All great photos but especially the one of the male lion at full speed – you have really caught the moment and the look in his eyes says it all……………!

Alistair Smith

Thank you Gillian. I don’t think I will ever forget that look in his eyes as he ran towards us at full speed.

Sylvain Villeroy De Galhau

Thanks Alistait for your magnificent pictures, they are stunning and many thanks for sharing the camera settings, this is super helpful for me amateur photographer! I have a few questions for you: one about the picture featuring the Mhangeni Pride with the buffalo(s): it looks very strange on my screen with stripes that almost like there is a problem with the picture. The other question is about the settings of your camera: I noticed that on many pictures you allow the ISOs to climb (3200) but speed was also very high (typically 1/3200) without any apparent need from the action to shoot so fast: is this deliberate or wouldn’t it have been safer for the picture quality to use lower speed in order to lower the ISOs?

Alistair Smith

Hi Sylvain thank you for your response. With regards to your first question, I’m not sure as to why you are seeing lines across the image, they certainly shouldn’t be there. With regards to the second question, quite often I am shooting with ISO-Auto, so I am allowing the camera to choose an appropriate ISO level based on the light available in a particular scenario. If the light is fading, the camera chooses higher ISO values, which in turn would result in faster shutter speeds even in situations where a fast shutter speed may not be required. In a situation where a subject is stationary, I will regain control of the ISO myself, choosing a value that is as low as possible, but as high as necessary, and I’ll keep monitoring how it affects my shutter speed. If you’d like me to answer any more questions you might have, please feel free to email me at asti@iafrica.com I’d be happy to answer any others you might have.

Sylvain Villeroy De Galhau

oops apologies for the spelling mistake in your name Alister

Denise Vouri

Beautiful photos Alistair. I especially like the close-up of the elephant trunk. You’ve managed to capture life in the bush in a creative and sensitive manner. Thank you!

Alistair Smith

Hi Denise. Thank you for those kind words. It means a lot to me. What I love most about photography is exactly that.. being able to capture moments.

Mary Beth Wheeler

Fabulous shot of the Majingilane running toward you! Quick thinking, fast camera actionon your part! Dark-maned one? Whomever he is, he still looks magnificent!

Alistair Smith

Hi Mary. It was the Scar-nosed Majingilane. It took some quick thinking, but thankfully my guests and I were prepared for the shot, anticipating that it was going to happen.

Wendy Hawkins

Wow I never get tired of seeing the Tailless Lioness & the Scar nosed Majingi! Your photos are stunning as always, thank you for sharing 🙂 Have a great weekend

Alistair Smith

Hi Wendy. Thank you for following my photography so closely. I appreciate your kind words. Have a wonderful weekend as well.

Lucie Easley

Theses are wonderful photos, both the color and black/white for detail. The lone rhino at sunrise was beautiful but also reminds us of how vulnerable they are. Can you help me understand the number system (Nkoveni 2:2 female and the Ndzanzeni 4:3 female)? Thank you.

Alistair Smith

Hi Lucie, much like our human fingerprints, all leopards have unique facial markings above the whisker line on either side of the face. The numbers represented in the ratios (2:2) refers to the numbers of spots on either side of the face, two on the right and two on the left. It’s a way in which we identify the territorial leopards here at Londolozi

Mauricia Neeley

always look forward to “this week in pictures” Is the Tailless’ cubs still alive? If so, how old are they now?

Alison Smith

well done Alistair! loved the photos!

Callum Evans

This has got to be one of the best Week in Pictures I’ve ever seen! The two potraits of the Majingilane males are increbile (love the eyes of the scar-nosed one) and so was the wild dog one!! The light on the martial eagle in flight was perfect and the Tailess Female crossing the river was so serene. I really can’t pick a favourite! Really looking forward to the blog on night photogarphy!

Connect with Londolozi

Follow Us

Sign up for our newsletter

One moment...
+
Add Profile