About the Author

Sean Zeederberg

Field Guide

As a young boy growing up on an agricultural farm in Zimbabwe, Sean spent every opportunity entertaining himself outdoors, camping in the local nature reserve and learning about all facets of the natural world. After completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental ...

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10 Comments

on Terrors in the Night

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Denise Vouri
Digital Tracker

Extremely informative blog on explaining the sight of big cats. I was always fascinated by their night vision. Thank you Sean.

Darlene Knott
Senior Digital Ranger

I cannot imagine the life of an impala, no wonder they are so jittery! And the lion’s eyes are amazing–when they look directly at me, it sends shivers down my spine! Love all the information. Thanks for sharing, Sean.

Eulalia Angédu
Explorer

The tsalala pride are my favorite.Very beautiful sunset awesome pictures too SEAN.Damn!Those lion eyes they’re too fierce.

Thank you for this information. After reading most blogs, I find myself researching things I never thought of. Hopefully by the time I get there, I will not need to ask a million questions:)

Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Great information about the sight of lions and leopards. Derek and Beverly Joubert mentioned in their documentary Soul of the Cat that they can not see certain coulors because their night vision is so good. We had a similar experience at Londolozi a few years ago with the Tsalsla pride hunting wildebeest on the airstrip. It was amazing.

Leonie De Young
Explorer

Great blog Sean and an interesting lesson. Beautiful pics and thanks for sharing your knowledge and pictures with us.

Fine investigative work. It is pleasant to find a fellow lion expert espousing knowledge. Refreshing actually. I’ve often wondered how the eyes of these cats work. Look forward to seeing more from you and commenting. I am an expert in Majingilane history too so tidings far well.

Kate Kellogg
Explorer

Wonderful article Sean! You write as eloquently as you speak. Your knowledge of animals, plants, birds and stars is impressive. You are a natural teacher. We had an exciting visit at Londolozi and learned so much from you and Joy! Thanks again from the Kellogg family!

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

I didn’t know that that was the name of the reflective membrane, thanks for that!

Callum Evans
Guest contributor

I didn’t know that that was the name of the reflective membrane, thanks for that!

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