Involved Leopards

Makhotini 3:3 Male

Makhotini 3:3 Male

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Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

Nhlanguleni 3:2 Female

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Flat Rock 3:2 Male

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

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Xidulu 2:3 Female

Xidulu 2:3 Female

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About the Author

James Tyrrell

Photographic Guide/Media Team

James had hardly touched a camera when he came to Londolozi, but his writing skills were well developed, and he was quickly snapped up by the Londolozi blog team as a result. An environment rich in photographers helped him develop the photographic skills ...

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13 Comments

on How to Raise Two Cubs

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Ian Hall
Senior Digital Ranger

Cracking opening shot

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Thanks Ian. We had quite a lucky morning – searched for them for about two hours before a lone male impala started alarming and pointed us in the right direction.
Fortunately they all went up onto this one termite ground that had shorter grass on i than the rest…!

Laura Eberly
Digital Ranger

Thank you for the update on Xidulu’s cubs, she was the first leopard I ever saw and she was special. I hope the male is ok, her cubs are beautiful.

Darlene Knott
Senior Digital Ranger

Stunning photos, James! I love leopards and am saddened by the number who do not make it. We saw the two cubs and their mother, who was killed, that you mentioned in the story. I hope the male is doing okay. Thanks for sharing this information!

Denise Vouri
Digital Tracker

I appreciate the information given on how difficult it is for leopards to raise their cubs to their age of independence. Leopards are one of my passions in the animal world and any photos or articles concerning these magnificent felines are welcomed. Well done!

Mike Ryan
Explorer

Thanks James fascinating

Jill Larone
Explorer

Beautiful pictures and great post, James! I keep hoping that the young Xidulu male will come wandering out of the long grass one of these days. Sadly, not likely, but I will keep hoping.

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

Hi Jill, we’re also keeping our fingers crossed…

Mj Bradley
Explorer

It is amazing to know that the mortality rate for young leopards is so high.. I think those of us who follow the Northern areas of the Sabi Sands got very spoiled following one of the dominant females, Karula. She raised 5 litters of two cubs to maturity. The last 2 cubs were left on their own at almost 14 months of age.. They are now 18 months and doing well.. I would really like to know what made this female so successful in raising her litters.. I suppose she will go down as a legend in Sabi Sands history.. Thank you all for your insight into the lives of the critters of the South African bush!

James Tyrrell
Photographic Guide/Media Team

MJ it’s hard to say why some females are more successful than others. I think in many cases it’s nothing more than good fortune…

Eulalia Angédu
Explorer

Wonderful pictures James.I love them all they’re all amazing.Bravo for your work.

Eulalia Angédu
Explorer

The flat rock male seems to be a predator of predators.It seems that he is establishing a very dangerous rein since he doesn’t spare his kind too.We hope for the appearance of the xidulu male soon.James BRAVO!Awesome text you have here.Marvelous beautiful pictures.

Irene Nathanson
Guest contributor

I love the cover shot. Who is that female? Is that Nkoveni ?

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