Involved Leopards

Robson's 4:4 Male

Robson's 4:4 Male

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Camp Pan 4:3 Male

Camp Pan 4:3 Male

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Marthly 3:2 Male

Marthly 3:2 Male

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Tutlwa 4:3 Female

Tutlwa 4:3 Female

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Nanga 4:3 Female

Nanga 4:3 Female

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Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male

Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male

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About the Author

Amy Attenborough

Media Team

Amy has a rich field-guiding history, having spent time at both Phinda and Ngala Game Reserves. This diversity of past guiding locations brought her an intimate understanding of different biomes across South Africa, and she immediately began making a name for herself as ...

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12 Comments

on Lionesses Chase Leopard off Kill

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Irene Nathanson
Member
Guest

Wow. As I began reading my heart just stopped concerned for nanga and her cub. What a great siting and story. Well told and captured. Seeing both the tailess lioness and those leopards recently during my stay made it even more interesting

Laura Eberly
Member
Guest

Wow! thank heavens the lionesses did not catch her!
Do you know if Karula who roamed the Djuma area was a daughter of Vomba? They said she was of Sunset bend heritage and so now I am trying to piece together her lineage.
Thank you so much!

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Laura. From what we know, we don’t think she was a daughter of Vomba. If you’re looking for more information on lineages though, take a look at our website dedicated to the leopards here… This may help! http://leopards.londolozi.com/
Thanks so much, Amy

Susan Strauss
Member
Guest

Ugh, my heart is in my throat!

Wendy Hawkins
Member
Guest

Wow wow wow!!! How amazing is this and I am also happy that the Nanga female managed to get away from the tailless lioness – phew! Thanks Amy

Lance Hutchins
Member
Guest

I’m really enjoying staying connected with current events at Londolozi via this daily blog. We visited in late April, but it almost seems like we never left!
I’m sure Andrea probably explained this to us, but can you remind a newbie the significance of the “4:4”, “3:2” and “5:5” numbers when describing individual leopards? Thanks and warmest regards to the Londolozi crew!

Amy Attenborough
Media Team

Hi Lance. The numbers refer to the number of spots on the uppermost line of a leopard’s cheeks from left to right if you’re facing the leopard. They help us to identify and distinguish one individual from another. Here is a link to a blog where the process is explained in detail. http://blog.londolozi.com/2012/04/11/how-to-identify-individual-leopards/
Many thanks, Amy

MJ Bradley
Member
Guest

Wow!! I am so happy that the beautiful Nanga female made good her escape and her cub also. Hearts must have been pumping hard during this event! The Tailless Lioness still has some pep in those old bones.

Mary Beth Wheeler
Member
Guest

Suspenseful story-telling, Amy!! So pleased Nanga is safe!

Susan Farrington
Member
Guest

Wow, what a sighting! Thanks for the video, and I’m so glad the leopard got away safely. I would be holding my breath, too! That was pretty cool how she crossed over to the other tree to get away.

Lea
Member
Guest

A heart stopping blog Amy, but thankfully all turned out well. Amazing to see tail less climbing the tree, but guess they will do anything for a meal. Thankfully Nanga was able to make her escape and hopefully back to her cub. Great story. Thank you

Marinda Drake
Master Tracker

Wow! Incredible interaction but so scary. Luckily a happy ending.

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