The Art of Tracking

by on February 19, 2011

in Life

“The Art of Tracking may well be the origin of science. After hundreds of thousands of years, traditional tracking skills may soon be lost. Yet tracking can be developed into a new science with far-reaching implications for nature conservation.” – Louis Liebenberg (The Art of Tracking).

The Tracker Academy endeavors to contribute significantly to the preservation of indigenous knowledge in South Africa by creating passionate African naturalists. The aim of the program is to empower the custodians of Africa’s wilderness to preserve the continents last remaining wild areas. By the skills they learn through the Tracking Academy, these naturalists will bring authenticity and accuracy to environmental education, anti-poaching, eco-tourism, data collection in field, research and conservation.

The Tracker Academy recruits candidates from disadvantaged communities whose dream it is to work in conservation, and who show an aptitude in traditional skills of tracking. From there they are trained in a 1 year, full time intensive tracking course, led by 3 experienced trainers. In addition to tracking, the course also focuses on developing conservation and life-skills such as literacy and positive health.

The Tracker Academy, a training division of the SA College for Tourism which operates under the auspices of Peace Parks Foundation, is housed at Londolozi. The one year full-time intensive tracking course, taught by 3 experienced trainers, is the first of its kind in southern Africa. The course focuses on developing tracking competency, conservation and life-skills, including literacy and positive health. Londolozi makes its land available free of charge to the Academy for all its bushveld practical training sessions and as part of its charitable donation to the Academy, also provides it with accommodation for the trainees as well as indoor training facilities.

To find out more about the Tracking Academy and how you can be involved visit – http://www.trackeracademy.co.za

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  • http://www.facebook.com/herman.prager Herman

    This is a great video. Congratulations to all. The videos generally are first rate but the work highlighted here is awesome.

    I must, add, of course seeing the Valentine’s Day video – LOL ROFL. All this just for a kiss? :)

    • http://blog.londolozi.com Rich

      Thanks Herman, Im glad that you enjoyed it and hopefully gained some insight into the art of tracking and the purpose of the Tracking Academy.

      As for the Valentines Day Video, Im pleased it had the intended purpose!

      Rich

  • http://www.facebook.com/jonathan.colerangle Jonathan Colerangle

    some of the best trackers are the san and khoi people of southern africa. They have been tracking animals that they hunt for thousands of years in nearly the same way as their ancestors.

    • http://blog.londolozi.com Rich

      Very true Jonathan. I was listening to Alex talk yesterday and it is part of this ancient knowledge that the San and Khoi people passed down for many generations that is slowly being lost today. The tracking academy is aiming to preserve this indigenous art of both these people as well as many others throughout South Africa.

  • penny parker

    very cool :)

    Oh, and by the way – the liebenberg tracking book is just AWESOME! just completed a FGASA level 1, and the tracks and signs work was so exihirating :)

  • tutani

    The one fills cold is the one goes to the fire .If you know your roots just follow them.This is what Trackers do.

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